Spring World 2015

Conference & Exhibit

Attend The #1 BC/DR Event!

Fall Journal

Volume 27, Issue 4

Full Contents Now Available!

DRJ Blogs

A short description about your blog
May 12
2014

Reading and writing

Posted by Andy Osborne in Untagged 

Andy Osborne

By Andy Osborne, Acumen
Originally posted on Oz's Business Continuity Blog

I like writing. I like reading too, although with everything else vying for my attention, I don’t get nearly enough time to read for pleasure.

Feb 20
2014

Ski boots and celery

Posted by Andy Osborne in Business Continuity Plans , Business Continuity Planning , Awareness

Andy Osborne

By Andy Osborne, Acumen.  
Originally posted on Oz's Business Continuity Blog.

I love skiing. It’s right up there on my list of top ten favourite things (I’ll keep the other nine and their relative positions to myself for now, on the grounds that divulging them may incriminate me).

Dec 24
2013

Rudolph the red-faced business continuity manager (a Christmas tale – sort of!)

Posted by Andy Osborne in Disaster Recovery , Business Continuity Plans , Business Continuity Management , Business Continuity

Andy Osborne

By Andy Osborne, Consultancy Director at Acumen

Once upon a time there was a senior manager called Rudolph who, on top of his other responsibilities, was put in charge of the business continuity project. Rudolph was a busy chap with a lot on his plate – he didn’t have time for detail. And anyway, disasters never happen do they? Well, only to other people. 

Nov 13
2013

Delving into the depths

Posted by Andy Osborne in Business Continuity Plans , Business Continuity Planning , Business Continuity Management , Business Continuity

Andy Osborne

By Andy Osborne, Acumen.    
Originally posted on Oz's Business Continuity Blog

Following the recent departure of number one son to Manchester (see “University challenge”), on Sunday afternoon I decided to address a small issue that's been troubling me for a while. For several years, in fact. When I say troubling, I mean causing my blood to simmer gently on a pretty much permanent basis, and to boil over about once a week, often punctuated by the phrase "...and tidy your @*~%#& bedroom!"

Nov 01
2013

University Challenge

Posted by Andy Osborne in Planning , Crisis Management , Business Continuity Management , Business Continuity

Andy Osborne

By Andy Osborne, Consultancy Director at Acumen

We recently reached a significant milestone in the Oz family history, when we transported number one son (number one as in the sequence in which they arrived, as opposed to any order of preference, I hasten to add) with a car chock-full of his gear, to his chosen university in Manchester, some 120 miles from home.

Oct 18
2013

A pair of debriefs

Posted by Andy Osborne in Exercising and testing , Business Continuity Management

Andy Osborne

By Andy Osborne, Consultancy Director at Acumen

It's fairly standard practice to hold some form of debrief at the end of an exercise or test, which is a very sensible thing to do. It helps to ensure that any issues and actions arising are captured and it's a good way to obtain feedback from the participants on how they thought things went. But some debriefs are a bit on the, well, brief side. Because it comes at the end of what can sometimes be a lengthy or challenging, sometimes stressful, session, it can be all too easy to make the debrief too brief. There can be a temptation to let people "get away" so that they can return to their day jobs. But the danger is that, once they do so, all the good stuff that the exercise teased out will be forgotten within a couple of weeks or, at best, vaguely remembered but not given the attention it deserves.

That's not to suggest that the debrief should be overly lengthy, just that sufficient time should be allowed  to ensure that everything that needs to be captured is, so that a follow-up action plan can be agreed.

And, whilst it may seem like a bit of a luxury, it can be very beneficial to hold two debriefs - a "hot" debrief immediately after the exercise or test and a second, "cold" debrief a couple of weeks later, after the proverbial dust has settled. Go on, be honest, how brief are your debriefs? And how many do you do? If you don't already do so, why not give the double-debrief a try after your next exercise or test and see what the results are like?