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Volume 27, Issue 3

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Data Efficiency … The Transformational Technology Of This Storage Era

Written by  Tom Cook August 26, 2013

Data Efficiency … The Transformational Technology Of This Storage Era

Transformational technologies are slow to take hold in storage. Until recently, storage was purchased based upon three basic criteria: performance, reliability and manageability. You may say, “whoa, what about price”, I’d argue price was set by performance requirements. Historically, these have been valuable competencies for storage companies and points of differentiation, but today – in a storage world that is virtualized, software defined, SSD accelerated, running on standard platforms and moving to the cloud, they are no longer are. Rather, they are now assumed attributes. So, how will storage companies compete going forward?

Ambuj Goyal, GM of IBM storage, says IBM will compete by “delivering more value (efficiency)” to customers. Ambuj and IBM have it right. I believe DATA EFFICIENCY technologies will define the competitive landscape in storage over the next 10 years. Why? We are in the midst of the most profound technological change in storage since the spinning disk and today’s mega-change is being driven by four major technology advancements: cloud, virtualization, flash and open systems/software defined storage. Data efficiency technologies are critical to the widespread adoption of each of these technologies. Here’s how:

  • Cloud – Cloud changes storage from a capital investment to an operating expense item and makes it very easy to compare service levels and cost. The metric becomes: $s/work unit and to compete service pro­viders are aggressively deploying data efficiency technologies. Performance, management, and reliability are governed by the SLA, so all are assumed and comparable from provider to provider. Cloud stor­age providers will lead the charge with data efficiency at the source and target, so they can overcome network bandwidth cost and performance issues and offer the most cost effective storage solution to compete and grab market share and build sustainable businesses.
  • Data transmission is still painful. In order to play in the hybrid world, data must be compressed and deduped and thereby only unique data is transmitted to the cloud. That means the enterprise will no longer rely upon cumbersome post-process, data efficiency schemes – it is too integral to the hybrid workflow. Data efficiency technologies will be automatic like RAID protection is today – inline, high performance, scalable and not requiring a super com­puter to operate.
  • Virtualization – Virtualization (server and desktop) puts extraordinary I/O demands on conventional storage sys­tems, creating huge performance bottlenecks and storage bloat. Data efficiency technologies elimi­nate these challenges and provide savings of 25X or more in most environments. In order to address this ex­panding market opportunity storage companies must have thin provisioning, dedupe and compres­sion to be competitive.
  • Flash – Performance (million + IOPS!) will not be an issue going forward as advancements in SSD technology and management take hold. Affordable and resilient performance is the challenge. Deduplication reduces write amplification and extends the life of flash to drop the effective cost of $s/work unit below spinning disk and pro­motes rapid and widespread adoption of SSDs in the market.
  • Open Systems/Software Defined Storage – Enable a new breed of competitor to enter the market – intensively distributed, fast to market, easy to use and capable to ad­dress entry level spinning disk to high performance flash arrays and cloud. Efficiency and cost are the key busi­ness drivers for the open system companies who are aggressively implementing data efficiency tech­nologies.

 

IDC analyst Natalya Yezhkova released a study forecasting 30% storage capacity growth 2013-2017 (down from 50% CAGR in recent years),” Data deduplication, data compression, thin provisioning and storage virtualization all will help enterprises limit their purchases of new storage capacity” and result in a 40% reduction of storage needs! In addition, IDC points to deduplication, compression and thin provisioning as three of the top five required storage attributes (Adoption and Benefits of Storage and Data Efficiency Technologies in the U.S. Storage Market, Jan 2013). Today’s high impact technologies: Cloud, Virtualization, Flash and Open systems/Software defined storage are impacting IT. Data efficiency technology is the single enabler for their broad adoption making “Data Efficiency the Transformational Technology in this storage era.”

- See more at: http://permabit.com/about/leadership/#sthash.vl7b4mPV.dpuf

Tom Cook, Chief Executive Officer and President, is responsible for guiding the company’s strategy and vision. Cook has more than 20 years of experience leading growth stage technology companies. Prior to joining Permabit, Cook led and completed the sale of web application developer, Curl Corporation to a division of the Sumitomo Corporation. Prior to Curl, Cook was President and CEO of audio tool maker, Cakewalk Software (acquired by Roland Corporation), which he led from start-up to worldwide market leadership. He also served as a director of or advisor to more than a dozen companies and organizations.

Cook has a Master’s degree in Business Administration from the Amos Tuck School of Business Administration, Dartmouth College, and a Bachelor’s degree in Economics from Harvard University.

- See more at: http://permabit.com/about/leadership/#sthash.vl7b4mPV.dpuf

Tom CookTom Cook is the chief executive officer and president of Permabit. He is responsible for guiding the company’s strategy and vision. Cook has more than 20 years of experience leading growth stage technology companies. Prior to joining Permabit, he led and completed the sale of web application developer, Curl Corporation to a division of the Sumitomo Corporation. Prior to Curl, Cook was President and CEO of audio tool maker, Cakewalk Software (acquired by Roland Corporation), which he led from start-up to worldwide market leadership. He also served as a director of or advisor to more than a dozen companies and organizations. Cook has a Master’s degree in business administration from the Amos Tuck School of Business Administration, Dartmouth College, and a bachelor’s degree in economics from Harvard University.