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Jun 26
2013

Big data, big changes, big trouble (in Little China)

Posted by: Jarrett F Potts in DRJ Blogs

Jarrett F Potts

Big data, big changes, big trouble (in Little China)

Every day you add more data to your infrastructure. Some analysts say it averages 20 percent year on year. There are certain types of organizations that can change up to 60 percent year on year. One way or another, data keeps growing and you keep buying more storage, and that can cause big trouble.

In 1986, the movie “Big Trouble in Little China” was released and changed the world. Its “B” grade kung fu moves and effects made everyone laugh, but there was a serious element to the movie too that translates into the world of IT. The main character Jack Burton said, “I'm a reasonable guy. But, I've just experienced some very unreasonable things.” This profound statement really does rock the IT world.Big Data Big Deal

How do you expect to reasonably keep up with big data if you do not make big changes in the way you deal with it? Big data means you have to make big changes. If you don’t, you will have big trouble in your little IT world. You have to start managing your data proactively, not reactively. You have to show your data who’s the boss.

Take control of your data by doing two simple steps that can save you time and money when it comes to managing your data. They may be simple items, but they can be a big change in your IT infrastructure and really affect the way your data grows and is protected: 

First is archiving. Take any data that is “orphaned” (has no owner) or has not been accessed in a long period of time and use the storage management product you have to archive the data. Once it is archived, you can delete the data off the primary disk. This is not the same as hierarchical storage management as there is no pointer left behind, but it will do in a pinch. It manages the data on disk and gets rid of any data you do not need.

Cleaning is also important. Analyst groups Gartner and Forrester both say that up to 10 percent of your data is “trash.” In this instance, “trash” means the core dumps, trash files, files that were not closed correctly and are unusable and others type of files that are of no real use to you, the users or your business. 

 Remember what Jack Burton says when it comes to challenges: “Just remember what ol' Jack Burton does when the earth quakes, and the poison arrows fall from the sky, and the pillars of Heaven shake. Yeah, Jack Burton just looks that big ol' storm right square in the eye and he says, ‘Give me your best shot, pal. I can take it.’"

By Jarrett Potts, director of marketing for STORServer

Follow me on Twitter @DarthTivoli. Learn more about STORServer at http://www.storserver.com