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Volume 29, Issue 4

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Jon Seals

According to the results of a recent survey of 150 IT decision makers at U.K. organizations with between 200 and 1,000 employees, fully 58 percent of surveyed companies acknowledged having suffered data breaches in the last two years.

The survey, conducted by Vanson Bourne and commissioned by GFI Software and Infinigate UK, also found that 37 percent of those attacks were deliberate acts that came from within the company, and 49 percent were deliberate acts from outside the company.

In response, 81 percent of respondents said preventing data breaches and increasing cloud security are among their organization's top priorities, and 89 percent respond to high-profile breaches by reviewing their current IT security posture.



As some of you may know, we’ve been discussing the Data Loss Index (DLI) for a while. On this occasion I’d like to focus on some of the repeat trends we keep seeing throughout time and among the many participating countries.

During the period of April to June 2016 we received over 3,000 anonymous entries of people who had lost data in their devices.

Reasons, types of devices and operating systems differed, however there were underlying similarities in the types of problems experienced.



With Starbucks and Apple logos so common in movies and TV shows that they’re practically unnoticeable, product placement for enterprise technology is the hot marketing challenge of the day.

As we ROFLed watching the season-three finale of Mike Judge’s Silicon Valley, it was hard not to notice the gigantic black rack bearing a green rectangle sitting in the cluttered garage of the Pied Piper/Bachmanity headquarters that doubles as the startup’s data center and triples as Jared’s bedroom.

HBO’s brilliant satirical take on the San Francisco Bay Area tech scene is where converged infrastructure vendors have found their perfect place for product placement.

But compared to the subtle appearances of SimpliVity’s OmniCube on the show – that’s what the much dreaded “box” Pied Piper was forced to build by its promptly ousted CEO Jack Barker was based on – the appearance Hewlett Packard Enterprise’s Synergy on the season finale is a rather clunky feat of enterprise product placement.



(TNS) - Have an emergency, but cannot call 911? In Camden County, N.J., help can still be summoned - with a text message to 911.

Camden County officials demonstrated the system - the first of its kind statewide to go live - Thursday afternoon at the county police communications center in Lindenwold.

Here, in the radio room, dispatchers seated before monitors can communicate via texts to learn details of the emergency and send help, Freeholder Jonathan Young said.

Rob Blaker, the county's public safety director, said the capability to text 911 went live March 13, but was not publicized pending statewide implementation. Since then, the county system has received about 130 emergency texts.



New research conducted by Beaming shows that cyber security breaches cost UK companies £34.1 billion last year, with bills for managing malware and data theft incidents amounting to £7.5 billion and £6.2 billion respectively.

More than fifth (22 percent) of business leaders surveyed told Beaming’s researchers they were ‘highly concerned’ about the threat of computer viruses. While half (49 percent) of businesses have enhanced the cyber security defences that protect their technology and communications networks and almost three quarters (72 percent) have insurance to cover losses caused by malware, 44 percent of firms only have basic levels of protection in place for the risk.

18 percent of business leaders said they were highly concerned by data theft and had invested in extensive measures to combat hackers. Fear of hackers was greatest amongst large companies, of which a third (33 percent) expressed a high level of concern. 22 percent of all businesses now discuss cyber security regularly at board level.

One in eight (13 percent) leaders said their IT infrastructure had been damaged by viruses over the last 12 months, costing infected organizations £10,516 in time and money spent managing each incident. Employees were found to be responsible for infecting computing systems in more than a third of cases (39 percent).

Large and medium businesses were almost twice as likely to contract viruses as smaller companies. 21 percent of firms with over 250 employees and 19 percent of 100 – 249 people businesses suffered due to malware last year, compared to just 11 percent of sub-100 people businesses.

Seven percent of leaders admitted their organizations were hit by hackers in the last year, with the average cost of each attack estimated to be £16,264. The risk of data theft also increases with business size: 16 percent of large companies suffered successful attacks last year, compared to 12 percent of medium sized firms and four per cent of small businesses.


Beaming engaged research consultancy Opinium to survey more than 500 UK business leaders about crimes that have affected their organizations in the year to 31 March 2016, their current security concerns and approaches to maintaining resilience. Figures showing the overall impact of security breaches were obtained by considering Beaming’s findings alongside business population estimates from the Department for Business, Innovation & Skills.


Paul Kudray believes that there are five human qualities which are shared by many resilience professionals. In this article he describes these essential skills; see if you agree with his assessment...

You may already know about my love for the resilience profession; I’ve written about it before. For a large part, my love affair is founded on mutual interests and a personality / character / skills match: I quite literally was born to do this!

I use the word ‘resilience’ to encompass all of us who work in and across business continuity management, emergency and disaster management, crisis management and those who provide disaster relief. To me, it doesn’t matter which resilience discipline or section you work in, the strengths and skills needed remain fairly constant.

So what are the key skills and strengths required to be great at our profession? What are the human qualities that make us great at what we do?



For early- to mid-stage B2B software and SaaS companies, selling in to the enterprise is hard. Getting a lot of enterprise customers to pay for your solution on a repeated and long-term basis without seeing your sales growth stall out at $15-25 million ARR? That’s really hard.

Welcome to the challenging world of enterprise sales.

Companies like Salesforce, Workday, NetSuite and athenahealth found lasting B2B sales success and turned their companies into pillars of the enterprise SaaS ecosystem. But the majority of private enterprise companies still face this Mount Everest of a challenge. Many factors can slow a company’s B2B sales progress, including competitive challenges, timing issues and product deficiencies.



In intellectual property management, mistakes can be extremely costly, and are, unfortunately, easy for an IP manager to make. The stakes are high: these could cause your company to lose its intellectual property (IP) rights, or worse, may result in competitors obtaining those rights.

Here are the Top 10 IP management slip-ups that can increase these threats to your company:



(TNS) - This is part of a continuing series about Washington state’s lack of preparation for a major earthquake.

All that separates Long Beach Elementary from the Pacific Ocean is a half-mile expanse of flat, sandy ground dotted with restaurants, hotels and shops catering to tourists. When the next Cascadia megaquake strikes, the 250 students at the school will face a choice Washington officials would rather not think about.

They can try to outrun the inevitable tsunami and reach high ground two miles away. Or they can hunker down in a two-story building that wasn’t designed to withstand an unstoppable wall of water. “It’s a nightmare I hope I never have to face,” said Principal Todd Carper. “Our current plan is a ‘go upstairs and hope’ situation.”

When it comes to protecting Washington schoolchildren from earthquakes and tsunamis, hope often substitutes for dollars and steel, The Seattle Times has found.



Amazon Web Services' Matt Wood, the general manager of product strategy at AWS who has overseen the recent spate of IT-oriented services from the company, unveiled expanded database migration and replication services at the Amazon Summit 2016 in Santa Clara on July 13.

SAP Adaptive Server Enterprise -- formerly Sybase -- has been added to the list of on-premises systems that customers may migrate into the cloud or, as in some cases, migrate away from the cloud. That list already included the Oracle and Microsoft SQL Server proprietary systems.

In addition, migrations from Oracle data warehouses and Teradata warehouses into Amazon Red Shift are now supported by AWS Database Migration Service. Wood also announced that Amazon is adding data replication one-click type of service. It was previously part of the database migration service, but in that context, it was turned off once the task of duplicating a company's database to a target system in the cloud had been completed.