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Spring Journal

Volume 29, Issue 2

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Jon Seals

Ormond Beach tech firm VOLO has doubled its office space to accommodate an expanded
workforce due to the growth of its business. The new space will provide enough space for
upwards of 50 employees. All new positions will be high-paying technology jobs.

VOLO's software suite enables businesses to proactively address, manage and communicate with
employees during unforeseen events. According to Mr. Felipe Portocarrero, the firm’s president,

"In today's world, threats to businesses take many forms: bomb threats, active shooters, severe
weather events are all realities impacting business today." Portocarrero adds, "Our business is
growing so quickly because our technology is no longer perceived as a luxury. To operate in
today's world, businesses must be prepared or face the consequences." Although VOLO serves
clients globally, VOLO's communications software has been used recently to help contain an
active shooter right here in Daytona Beach.

In addition to expanding its Ormond Beach workforce, VOLO is also increasing its footprint on the
West Coast by opening a second headquarters in Las Vegas. Portocarrero explains: "Having a
second headquarters in Las Vegas makes sense. We can expand our normal operating hours and
better service our clients on the West Coast. Additionally, we will have access to prime
development talent located nearby in California.”

ABOUT VOLO
Founded in 2007 starting with only 2 employees, VOLO is now the premier provider of SaaS Solutions for
the Enterprise Risk Management, Business Continuity, and Disaster Recovery community. VOLO delivers
high availability in-bound and out-bound communications, event monitoring, automated alerting, and
storage applications via a proprietary cutting-edge platform. VOLO's reach extends globally, working
with clients from the Fortune 100 list and the United States Armed Forces to businesses and healthcare
facilities in almost every U.S. city.

Ready to offer cloud backup and disaster recovery (BDR) services?

A managed service provider that wants to enter the cloud BDR services market will need to determine how to price its offerings, which may seem exceedingly difficult.

There are three common pricing strategies that MSPs may use for their cloud BDR services:

...

http://mspmentor.net/backup-and-disaster-recovery/which-pricing-strategy-right-your-cloud-bdr-services

Wednesday, 17 February 2016 00:00

Data Center Extends Cloud’s Edge to Minneapolis

Just like a popular YouTube video is cheaper to deliver from a data center that’s in the same geographical region than from a remote one, both providers and users of enterprise cloud services benefit if the services are delivered from a local data center.

Quickly growing adoption of cloud services by enterprises has driven edge data center specialist EdgeConneX to locate its latest facility in Minneapolis. The Minneapolis-St. Paul metro has a population of about 3.8 million, yet digital content and cloud services consumed by its residents and companies have traditionally been served from data centers 400 miles away, in Chicago, Clint Heiden, chief commercial officer at EdgeConneX, said.

“When you have a [market] the size of Minneapolis-St. Paul pulling from another core market like Chicago, that to us screams like an edge market,” he said.

...

http://www.datacenterknowledge.com/archives/2016/02/17/edge-data-center-geared-for-cloud-launches-in-minneapolis/

Apple AAPL +0.65% CEO Tim Cook has written an open letter to customers warning them of a “dangerous” request from the FBI to effectively create a backdoor in their iPhones. Cook was writing in response to a court order asking Apple to create a tool that would allow for unlimited guesses at a user’s passcode, in this case to crack into the iPhone of one of the San Bernardino shooters, who killed 14 and injured 22 others in December 2015.

On standard iPhones, the user can only attempt to get the passcode right 10 times before the device wipes itself. The order, handed down under the All Writs Act of 1789, demands Apple write a program for the government that would undo that and allow for so-called “brute force” attacks on iPhones. This would effectively break any encryption protections, as the passcode is the only real barrier between a hacker, be they government or criminal, and an iPhone. Once the passcode is broken, most encryption protections on iPhones are bypassed.

...

http://www.forbes.com/sites/thomasbrewster/2016/02/17/tim-cook-takes-on-fbi-over-encryption-bypass/

Unfortunately in today’s world, active shooter preparation is becoming an essential emergency response practice for organizations of all shapes and sizes.  In fact, between the years 2000 to 2013, “the FBI identified 160 active shooter incidents and 1,043 casualties – an average of 6.4 incidents occurred in the first seven years, and 16.4 occurring in the following seven.” [1]

Although each organization is different, there are steps you can take for active shooter training to ensure that your employees and managers are prepared to initiate a response plan and manage the consequences of each incident:

...

http://www.everbridge.com/active-shooter-preparedness-protect-your-employees-with-an-emergency-response-plan/

Amazon Web Services has signed an agreement to acquire NICE, a software-as-a-service company based in Italy that helps customers optimize and centralize their HPC, cloud and visualization resources. The terms of the deal were not disclosed, but it is expected to close in Q1 2016.

According to NICE’s sparse website, it will continue to operate under its existing brand, and continue to support and develop EnginFrame and Desktop Cloud Visualization (DCV) products.

AWS didn’t drone on about the acquisition, instead opting for a short blog post written by AWS’ Chief Evangelist Jeff Barr, to briefly sum up the news. While not a lot may be known about the acquisition at this point, it is clear there are three main reasons why AWS pulled the trigger on the deal.

...

http://www.datacenterknowledge.com/archives/2016/02/16/three-reasons-aws-just-bought-italian-saas-firm-nice/

During historic 1998 El Niño season that created $550 million in damages, it was not until February that California experienced flooding damage that warranted a federal presidential declaration
 

OAKLAND, Calif. – The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) today released new data on National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) policies, showing an increase of more than 27,000 new NFIP policies written in California during the month of December 2015. There is a 30 – 90 day waiting period for new policies to be reported to FEMA and the latest available data, released today, shows an increase of more than 55,500 new flood insurance policies purchased in California from August 31 – December 31, 2015.


The nearly 25% increase for the state is the first of its kind, in any state, in the history of the National Flood Insurance Program, created in 1968.

“FEMA recognizes that a government-centric approach to emergency management is not adequate to meet the challenges posed by a catastrophic incident,” said FEMA Region 9 Administrator Robert Fenton. “Utilizing a whole community approach to emergency management reinforces that FEMA is only one part of our nation’s emergency management team and individuals are arguably the most important part of that team.”
Although the agency does not directly correlate all NFIP claims this year to El Niño, FEMA has already seen 127 National Flood Insurance Program policyholders submit claims in California during January 2016 compared to only 1 claim submitted in California for the same period during the previous year.

Although parts of FEMA Region 9 have recently been in a relative dry period, according to the National Weather Service, the impact of El Niño is not over.

“It has not been uncommon during past strong El Niño events to go through drier periods, even during the winter months,” said National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration/National Weather Service meteorologist Scott Carpenter. “A change in the weather pattern around the last week of February may start bringing the storm track farther south and across more of California into March.”
NOAA's Climate Prediction Center forecasts climate anomalies associated with the ongoing El Niño episode are expected to result in at least minimal improvements to the drought conditions across much of California and western Nevada through the end of April.

NOAA's mission is to understand and predict changes in the Earth's environment, from the depths of the ocean to the surface of the sun, and to conserve and manage our coastal and marine resources.
Flooding can happen anywhere, but certain areas are especially prone to serious flooding. Many areas in California are at increased flood risk from El Niño, as a direct result of wildfires and drought.

Residents should be aware of a couple things:

o You can’t get flood insurance at the last minute. In most cases, it takes 30 days for a new flood insurance policy to go into effect. So get your policy now.
o Only Flood Insurance Covers Flood Damage. Most standard homeowner’s policies do not cover flood damage.
o Get all the coverage you need. An agent can walk you through coverage options.
o Know your flood risk. Visit FloodSmart.gov (or call 1-800-427-2419) to learn more about individual flood risk, explore coverage options and to find an agent in your area.

In September 2015, FEMA’s Region 9 office in Oakland, Calif., established an El Niño Task Force with the mission of preparing for the impact of El Niño. The task force is evaluating the core capabilities needed to protect against, mitigate, respond to, and recover from any flooding that occurs across the Region this winter and spring. In December 2015, FEMA Region 9 released its draft El Niño severe weather response plan and convened a Regional interagency steering committee meeting in Northern California to exercise the plan. The plan is a living document and is continuously updated as new information on the El Niño threat emerges.

FEMA administers the National Flood Insurance Program and works closely with more than 80 private insurance companies to offer flood insurance to homeowners, renters, and business owners. In order to qualify for flood insurance, the home or business must be in a community that has joined the NFIP and agreed to enforce sound floodplain management standards.
NFIP is a federal program and offers flood insurance which can be purchased through private property and casualty insurance agents. Rates are set nationally and do not differ from company to company or agent to agent.

These rates depend on many factors, which include the date and type of construction of your home, along with your building's level of risk.

Visit Ready.gov for more preparedness tips and information and follow @FEMARegion9 on Twitter.

Wednesday, 17 February 2016 00:00

The Data Center Cloud Built

This month (February), we focus on data centers built to support the Cloud. As cloud computing becomes the dominant form of IT, it exerts a greater and greater influence on the industry, from infrastructure and business strategy to design and location. Webscale giants like Google, Amazon, and Facebook have perfected the art and science of cloud data centers. The next wave is bringing the cloud data center to enterprise IT… or the other way around!

Here’s a collection of stories that ran on Data Center Knowledge in February, focusing on the data center and the cloud:

Telco Central Offices Get Second Life as Cloud Data Centers – As AT&T and other major telcos, such as Verizon, upend their sprawling network infrastructure to make it more agile through software, most of those facilities will eventually look less like typical central offices and more like cloud data centers.

...

http://www.datacenterknowledge.com/archives/2016/02/16/the-data-center-cloud-built/

Wednesday, 17 February 2016 00:00

The Many Ways Passwords Put Data at Risk

Just in time for tax season comes word of all kinds of security breakdowns within important tax-related organizations.

For example, there was the announcement from the IRS that it was hacked (again). As CIO explained it:

In its review, the IRS identified unauthorized attempts involving about 464,000 unique Social Security numbers. About 101,000 Social Security numbers were used to access E-file PINs.

Also, several tax preparation companies reported breaches, which were likely caused because of poor password management. One of those breached companies was TaxSlayer, whose director of customer support Lisa Daniel was quoted by eSecurity Planet:

...

http://www.itbusinessedge.com/blogs/data-security/the-many-ways-passwords-put-data-at-risk.html

Wednesday, 17 February 2016 00:00

Designing Data Centers for the Future

In January, we focused on data center design. We looked into design best practices and examined some of the most interesting new design trends. Here are the stories we ran as part of our data center design month:

Data Center Design: Which Standards to Follow? – Codes must be followed when designing, building, and operating your data center, but “code” is the minimum performance requirement to ensure life safety and energy efficiency in most cases. A data center is going to probably be the most expensive facility your company ever builds or operates. Should it have the minimum required by code?

Startup Envisions Data Centers for Cities of the Future – The Project Rhizome team is thinking of ways to design small urban data centers so they fit in urban environments functionally, economically, and aesthetically.

...

http://www.datacenterknowledge.com/archives/2016/02/16/designing-data-centers-for-the-future/