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Spring Journal

Volume 29, Issue 2

Full Contents Now Available!

Jon Seals

Self-Study Elearning Course & Certification

Offered as part of our Crisis Management & Communication Discipline in ICOR University, CMC 5000 provides critical information for those responsible for managing crises in the organization and providing both internal and external communications.  

UIC EMCP  

The University of Illinois Chicago offers this course to its students as part of its Emergency Management & Continuity Certificate Program and now this same course is available to the public.  

Offered as a self-study elearning course, CMC 5000 is ideal for senior management responsible for leading the organization during a crisis, those in public affairs, public relations, or anyone who is participates in crisis management in the organization.  

Successful completion of the course and passing the online examination results in earning the ICOR Credential, "Crisis Management & Communication Professional (CMCP).  

Register for the E-Learning Course 

 
CMC 5000: Crisis Management Communication Professional (CMCP)
The Discipline of Crisis Management
An Organization's Culture & its Impact on its Crisis Management Capability
Organizational Structure & Crisis Management
Crisis Communications Planning
The Role of Issues Readiness & Crisis Readiness in Crisis Management
The Importance of Leadership in a Crisis
Teams & their Role in Crisis Management
Managing the Crisis Communication Response
 
The Discipline of Crisis Management
The course begins with an introduction to the crisis management discipline, different scenarios to consider when preparing to write a crisis management plan, and the key elements of a crisis management plan based on international standard and PAS requirements.
An Organization's Culture & its Impact on its Crisis Management Capability
The importance of the role of organizational culture cannot be underestimated both in managing every day events and in particular in managing crises. Next we look at how to analyze the culture of the organization and work within its structure to create a more resilient organization and increase its crisis management capability. 
Organizational Structure & Crisis Management
Have you considered how the structure of the organization itself might impact its ability to manage a crisis?  This session takes a close look at how the structure of an organization can be its greatest asset or its greatest weakness - evaluating your organization and its structure may impact it crisis management capability. 
Crisis Communications Planning 
It is very important to develop a crisis communication system that aligns to
any crisis event effecting the organization. We will look at communication tools, strategies for communication - including social media strategies, message development, and the importance of media training.
The Role of Issues Management & Crisis Readiness in Crisis Management  
Reviewing topics such as situational awareness, horizon scanning, issues management, and how they contribute to a more "crisis-aware" organization, the course looks at the role of crisis readiness and issue management and its importance in managing a potential crisis event.
The Importance of Leadership in a Crisis
Understanding the elements of leadership in times of crisis may help better explain more
than any set of crisis plans why some organizations survive crises better than others and clarify how organizations can endure future crises. This lesson focuses on leadership qualities that have been shown to support the development of an effective crisis response.
Teams & their Role in Crisis Management 
A crisis cannot be managed by one person. A key factor in all crisis management programs
is the designation of a crisis management team engaged to manage the crisis event. This lesson focuses on the purpose of crisis management teams, who to choose to be on the team, and the importance of managing conflict within the team itself.  
Managing the Crisis Communication Response  
Building on the lesson on crisis communications planning, this lesson focuses specifically on crisis communication and reputation management by looking at modern case studies of organizations who have done it well - and at some who have not done it as well - in order to determine what works best for your organization.
Questions?  Contact Education@theicor.org or call 866-765-8321 or visit our website www.theicor.org.
 
Sincerely,
 
Lynnda Nelson, President
The International Consortium for Organizational Resilience
 
Save 10%
Did you know that you can save 10% on all ICOR courses if you are a member of one of the following organizations?  Contact them to find out how or email info@theicor.org.
  • ICOR
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  • AFCOM
  • ASIS
  • BRPA
  • BRPA SW
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The cloud has revolutionized the way we build IT systems within enterprises. Indeed, enterprise IT’s goal since the inception of cloud computing has been to replicate the power of cloud computing within their own data centers.

The trouble is that cloud computing systems were built net-new, which meant they could start from scratch and thus be more innovative with the use of cloud-based resources using the most modern technology and approaches available. Enterprises don’t have the same luxury. Decades of enterprise hardware and software purchases exist at different levels of maturation, and those structures must also support mission-critical systems in operations.

However, things are changing. New technology now provides enterprises with the public cloud experience, which includes:

...

http://www.datacenterknowledge.com/archives/2016/06/21/creating-public-cloud-experience-house/

The incredible amount of energy needed to power data centers is well documented. Globally, data center energy use accounts for three percent of all electricity consumed, a figure that will continue to grow in the coming years. While fueling one of the backbones of our economy, this incredible power usage has resulted in staggering electricity bills and large amounts of pollution associated with producing that energy. To help combat this, utility companies in recent years have been offering incentive programs to data center owners and operators who are willing to make their facilities more energy efficient.

While these incentives are incredibly beneficial to data centers, I’ve found many operators hesitant to take advantage of the opportunity for a variety of reasons, including not being sure where to start, fear of unknown project costs, and confusion on the different types of incentives that are available. These concerns are all very understandable, and I can share some knowledge to help clear up the confusion that surrounds utility incentive programs.

...

http://www.datacenterknowledge.com/archives/2016/06/21/how-to-make-best-use-of-utility-incentives-for-data-centers/

The company IT Security perimeter no longer exists, now that mobile and cloud computing are so prevalent. The availability of files and information to employees in the office, on site, on the road or at home is high.

But then so are the IT security risks that go with such availability, unless appropriate measures are taken.

Those measures cannot be the same as the traditional firewall solutions, because so much computing activity now takes place outside such firewalls.

The security paradigm has to be turned inside out. Instead of trying to keep all data within one big fence, each piece of data must travel with its own protection.

...

http://www.opscentre.com/it-security-without-borders/

How do you ensure that the time and money spent on business continuity is yielding the desired results? Karen Humphris, senior advisory manager at ContinuitySA, looks at the subject and provides a checklist of 12 critical BCM success factors.

As business continuity management (BCM) becomes more important as a way to mitigate risk and create peace of mind, ensuring the money and time spent on BCM yields the desired results is critical. Organizations need to be certain that the BCM programme they have in place is realistic, and that it will work. One of the best ways of answering these questions is to measure how mature the BCM plan and capability actually is.

Measuring, as we all know, is the first and vital step to managing anything.

...

http://www.continuitycentral.com/index.php/news/business-continuity-news/1209-bcm-measurement-twelve-critical-bcm-success-factors

Tuesday, 21 June 2016 00:00

The Unsuspecting BYOD User

Many companies have adopted a BYOD program, recognizing the productivity benefits that can deliver. In addition, more and more companies require BYOD users to use a device passcode to prevent company data from falling into the wrong hands if the device is lost or stolen.

However, much like desktop security threats, the risk of data loss from malware and vulnerabilities must also be considered as part of a mobile security program.

Users, unfortunately, are mostly unaware that they can easily get a malware infection by visiting a compromised website and downloading a malicious app. Once on the device, the app can then access confidential data on the device as well as access the corporate network.  Contrary to popular belief, iOS devices are just as susceptible to malware as Android devices, and Skycure has identified that any business with over 200 iOS devices has at least one malware infection.

...

https://www.citrix.com/blogs/2016/06/20/the-unsuspecting-byod-user/

Business resilience is your organization’s ability to adapt and adequately respond to events—no matter how critical the situation—that affect your business internally or externally with little impact to your operations, people, and structure. Your business’s ability to be resilient and prepared relies on careful, corresponding planning related to both business continuity and disaster recovery, and at the forefront of prevention and strong response is access to monitoring your business and your people.

Maintaining a resilient business with regular operations before, during, and after an unexpected event requires emergency notification software that, like business resilience and disaster recovery planning, takes a holistic approach. In order to build a resilient business, you must be able to rely on your emergency notification software to monitor everything around you—potential threats, your people, your business, your communications. You need the full picture of what is exactly going on at all times.

AlertMedia keeps the pulse of your business – monitoring what your organization cares about most.

...

https://www.alertmedia.com/building-resilience-through-monitoring

There are some very important risks in your construction fleet that you may be overlooking. Independent contractors can introduce risks and your employees using their personal vehicles could pose other hidden exposure to your business. These are two top issues to be aware of, and here are some suggestions for mitigating them.

Independent Contractors

If you hire independent contractors, you could be sued for their actions in relation to a vehicle accident that they cause while working for you.

To reduce this exposure, ensure that each of your independent contractors has a valid auto liability insurance policy. Make sure the policy is in force throughout the duration of their contract with you. Additionally, be sure that their insurance carrier is financially stable. You can verify the insurance carrier’s financial strength at www.ambest.com.

...

http://www.riskmanagementmonitor.com/the-hidden-risks-in-your-construction-fleet/

AUSTIN, Texas – Two important deadlines are ahead for Texans who are considering a loan through the U.S. Small Business Administration for recovery from the April storms and flooding.

Most survivors who registered with FEMA for disaster assistance were contacted by the SBA with information on the agency’s loan-interest disaster loans, as well as instructions on how to complete the loan application.

The deadline to submit the application for physical damage is June 24, 2016.  The deadline for businesses to submit a loan application for economic injury is Jan. 25, 2017.

The SBA is the federal government’s primary source of money for the long-term rebuilding of disaster-damaged private property, offering low-interest disaster assistance loans to businesses of all sizes, private nonprofit organizations, homeowners and renters.

Survivors may apply online using the electronic loan application via SBA’s secure website at disasterloan.sba.gov/ela.

Disaster loan information and application forms are also available from SBA’s customer service center by calling 800-659-2955 or emailing disastercustomerservice@sba.gov. Individuals who are deaf or hard‑of‑hearing may call 800-877-8339. For more disaster assistance information or to download applications, visit sba.gov/disaster.

Completed applications should be mailed to:

U.S. Small Business Administration
Processing and Disbursement Center
14925 Kingsport Rd.
Fort Worth, TX  76155

SBA loan applications should be submitted even as disaster survivors await an insurance settlement. The loan balance is reduced by the settlement. SBA loans may also be available for losses not covered by insurance.

Both FEMA and the SBA encourage Texans who suffered damage or loss from the April storms and were provided a loan application to complete the application.  There is no obligation to take a loan if offered. If approved, and a survivor does not accept the loan, it may make them ineligible for additional federal assistance.

  • Homeowners may borrow up to $200,000 from SBA to repair or replace their primary residence.

  • Homeowners and renters may borrow up to $40,000 to repair or replace personal property.

  • Businesses may borrow up to $2 million for any combination of property damage or economic injury. SBA offers low-interest working capital loans—called Economic Injury Disaster Loans—to small businesses and most private nonprofit organizations of all sizes.

# # #

FEMA’s mission is to support our citizens and first responders to ensure that as a nation we work together to build, sustain, and improve our capability to prepare for, protect against, respond to, recover from, and mitigate all hazards.

If you are heading up an application develop team or are running an IT organization and you are looking at your developers initial steps to developing cloud native applications, I want to share some experienced insights gained from PaaS customers.  For me it is a view of the path many of you may be heading down applying some best practices that can optimize Dev and Ops together.

Apprenda, one of our ACI ecosystem partners, and Cisco recently hosted a series of presentations, we called PaaS Days, about the Application-Centric Enterprise to share how private PaaS and policy driven automation together can address real-world problems such as application time-to-market, datacenter security and corporate compliance.   I want to share some insights I gained there about different application strategies for cloud. Depending on the company’s cloud maturity level and whether the management is centralized or not, the application strategy can take on a project oriented or an organization level scope.

...

http://blogs.cisco.com/datacenter/developer-productivity-paas-compliance-and-policy-driven-infrastructure