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Volume 27, Issue 4

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DRJ Blogs

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Aug 20
2013

The National Preparedness Month 2013 Toolkit

Posted by Ed Sterrett in Untagged 

Ed Sterrett

September is National Preparedness Month! Here are the "official" toolkits provided by FEMA- 

Aug 13
2013

Emergency Preparedness, Zombie Style!

Posted by Ed Sterrett in Untagged 

Ed Sterrett

From the Centers for Disease Control’s Office of Public Health Preparedness and Response

 (seriously)

Jul 29
2013

Traumatic Incident Stress: No Good Deed..

Posted by Ed Sterrett in Untagged 

Ed Sterrett

..goes unpunished, they say. Nowhere is that more true than with those who respond to disasters- natural or man-made, where death and severe injury is present.  These workers are at risk of experiencing stress from what psychologists refer to as a traumatic incident. A traumatic incident is one that may involve exposure to catastrophic events, severely injured children or adults, dead bodies or body parts, or a loss of colleagues. All workers involved in response activities help themselves and their coworkers and reduce the risk of experiencing stress associated with a traumatic incident by utilizing simple methods to recognize, monitor, and maintain health on-site and following such experiences.  

A Personal Case Study

As emergency responders, we often feel a need to “be brave”, impervious to the bad things we see, stoic in the face of tragedy. Unfortunately, that is not the case. The very parts of our nature that drive us to respond to disasters- to help those most affected- also prevents us from turning a completely blind eye to what we witness. We may fool ourselves for a while, but sooner or later, it will surface.

Jun 27
2013

Workplace Disasters: Ready?

Posted by Ed Sterrett in Preparedness , Emergency Response , Disaster Response , Business Continuity

Ed Sterrett

When we think of disasters and the workplace, its usually in the context of a natural disater such as tornadoes, hurricanes or earthquakes- depending on where one is located. But these are actually the tip of the iceberg- which is a good analogy in fact. The iceberg that was struck by the Titanic would not be considered a "natural disaster" in the same way as a hurricane, but it was no less a disaster for the Titanic.

Because of the belief that the ship was unsinkable, less attention was given to preparing for such an event. Any instructions on how to abandon ship, don life vests, etc., were given tongue in cheek, if at all. Design and other interests were given precedence over providing sufficient life boats, primarily due to management perception that "it can't happen here."