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Summer Journal

Volume 29, Issue 3

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Today we’re pleased to publish an interview between Maurice Gilbert, Corporate Compliance Insights’ Founder and CEO, and Manuel Martinez-Herrera, VP of Legal and Compliance at Namely.  Namely is the leading HR platform for midsize companies and an all-inclusive solution for HR administration and compliance.  Manuel offers insight into some of the greatest threats facing corporations today and explains how the Namely platform helps to mitigate those risks. 

Maurice Gilbert: How did you get started on a career in law and compliance?

Manuel Martinez-Herrera: It all happened in a very serendipitous way. I’m originally from Madrid, Spain. When I was 17, I spent a summer in Nantes, France, learning French. While there, I met an older friend who was going to law school. I should point out at this point that law in Spain, as in many other countries, is an undergraduate degree. At the time, I was undecided on what to study in college. This friend convinced me that law school was the way to go. As my parents can attest, even before entering kindergarten, I already had a special talent at arguing any case, especially my own. Thus, law school seem like a good fit.

Now, almost 20 years after, I can proudly say that that decision allowed me to embark on an international journey, thanks to which I have studied or worked as a lawyer on three different continents and in six cities (in chronological order: Madrid, Dijon, Barcelona, Buenos Aires, Boston and New York).

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http://corporatecomplianceinsights.com/maintaining-hr-compliance-in-a-shifting-regulatory-environment/

It’s no secret that bigger data centers benefit from economies of scale. It costs less to provide X amount of data center capacity in a massive warehouse-scale facility than it does in a small data center.

The number of factors influencing total data center cost is almost countless, but that economies of scale are real is generally accepted as a fact. However, little data has been available publicly on exactly how much of a difference those economies of scale can make. A recent study by the Ponemon Institute, funded by Emerson Network Power, aims to quantify this difference.

And, as it turns out, the difference is huge. Even if you compare a data center that is 500 to 5,000 square feet in size to one that is between 5,001 and 10,000 square feet, it costs as much as 64 percent less on average to provide 1kW of IT capacity in the larger facility, the researchers found.

...

http://www.datacenterknowledge.com/archives/2016/08/23/what-is-the-data-center-cost-of-1kw-of-it-capacity/

CHARLESTON, W.Va.If you registered for help from FEMA and got a letter (often called a “determination letter”), you may want to appeal the decision made regarding your application for federal assistance. Here are some tips to help you:

  • Every disaster survivor has a right to appeal. Read your letter carefully all the way through to understand FEMA’s reason for its decision. This will allow you to know exactly why to appeal. Appeals must be made in writing and sent by mail or fax to FEMA within 60 days of receiving the letter.

  • It’s important to submit insurance information. If your coverage is not enough to make essential home repairs, provide a place to stay, or replace certain contents, FEMA can review your application. But you must provide documents from your insurance company that detail your settlement. Remember also that FEMA cannot duplicate homeowners’ or renters’ insurance benefits.

    • Contact your insurance company if you need settlement documents.

  • Prove occupancy. If you’re a homeowner or renter, FEMA can reconsider you for grants if you provide documents that prove the damaged structure was your main residence. You can prove this was your main home with utility bills, a driver’s license or a copy of your lease. You cannot receive federal disaster assistance for secondary or vacation homes.

  • Prove ownership. If you can prove you own the home, FEMA can reconsider you for grants to make a structure safe, sanitary and functional. Documents you can submit to prove ownership may include mortgage or insurance documents, tax receipts or a deed. If you don’t have a deed handy, speak to your local or county officials about obtaining a copy.

  • There are many other reasons you may disagree with a decision. If you registered you should have received a booklet called “Help after a Disaster” that details how FEMA determines who’s eligible for assistance. You can also access the booklet online at www.fema.gov/help-after-disaster. The booklet lists what information you need to include when appealing.

Mail or fax appeal documents within 60 days of receiving your FEMA determination letter to the address below:

  • FEMA National Processing Service Center
        P.O. Box 10055
        Hyattsville, MD 20782-7055
  • Fax documents to 800-827-8112.

If you have any questions about your determination letter or any other disaster recovery issues you may always call the FEMA helpline at 800-621-3362 (voice, 711 or video relay services) or 800-462-7585 (TTY). Lines are open 7 a.m. to 10 p.m. EDT seven days a week until further notice. Or you may:

West Virginia disaster survivors are reminded that the deadline to register for FEMA assistance is Wednesday, Sept 7.

Additional information on West Virginia’s disaster recovery can be found by calling the FEMA Helpline 800-621-3362 or visiting: www.DisasterAssistance.gov; the flood pages at wvflood.com; fema.gov/disaster/4273; twitter.com/femaregion3; and fema.gov/blog.

(TNS) - Obama administration emergency managers are proposing to toughen the requirements for federally funded construction projects to try to make flood-prone communities more resilient to the increased risks of flooding expected to be caused by global warming.

The Federal Emergency Management on Monday proposed the rules, which would require federally funded construction to take place on higher ground, farther from floodplain areas.

“Flooding is the most common and costly type of natural disaster in the United States, and floods are expected to be more frequent and more severe over the next century due in part to the projected effects of climate change,” the agency said in its proposal, published in the Federal Register. “This proposed rule would ensure that FEMA Federally Funded Projects are designed to be resilient to both current and future flood risks.”

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http://www.emergencymgmt.com/disaster/FEMA-seeks-to-move-construction-away-from-flood-zones.html

Wednesday, 24 August 2016 00:00

7 Database Security Best Practices

Databases - by definition - contain data, and data such as credit card information is valuable to criminals. That means databases are an attractive target to hackers, and it's why database security is vitally important.

Here are seven useful database security best practices that can help keep your databases safe from attackers.

Ensure Physical Database Security

In the traditional sense this means keeping your database server in a secure, locked environment with access controls in place to keep unauthorized people out. But it also means keeping the database on a separate physical machine, removed from the machines running application or web servers.

...

http://www.esecurityplanet.com/network-security/6-database-security-best-practices.html

Wednesday, 24 August 2016 00:00

FEMA: Begin Flood Cleanup as Soon as Possible

It’s not too early to begin cleaning up from Louisiana’s severe storms and floods that began Aug. 11.

Flood-damaged items like carpeting, bedding, furniture and other household items can be serious health hazards as well as eyesores. Here are some tips to dispose of these items safely and jumpstart your recovery:

File an Insurance Claim then Register with FEMA

  • Contact your insurance company and file a claim. Get your company’s contact information online at the Louisiana Department of Insurance: www.ldi.la.gov/onlineservices/ActiveCompanySearch.                                     

  • If you have flood insurance questions call 800-621-3362 Monday through Friday from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. and select option 2. Call center staff are available to assist with information regarding your policy, offer technical flood guidance to aid in recovery and answer other flood insurance questions. You can be transferred to your insurance carrier for additional assistance if you have further questions.

  • Register for federal disaster assistance. If you had severe storm or flood damage in Acadia, Ascension, Avoyelles, East Baton Rouge, East Feliciana, Evangeline, Iberia, Iberville, Jefferson Davis, Lafayette, Livingston, Point Coupee, St. Helena, St. Landry, St. Martin, St. Tammany, Tangipahoa, Vermilion, Washington and West Feliciana parishes you may apply for FEMA help online at DisasterAssistance.gov or by calling 800-621-3362. Lines are open every day from 6 a.m. to 10 p.m. Survivors who use TTY may call 800-462-7585.

Start Cleaning Up Now

  • Mold may be a serious health risk so don’t wait for a visit from FEMA or your insurance company before you start cleaning up. FEMA inspectors and insurance claims adjusters will still be able to verify flood damage.

  • Because mold may be a serious health risk, it’s important to remove flood-damaged valuables from your home. Take lots of pictures before your insurance adjuster visits.

  • Be sure to consult with your local officials for instructions before setting out debris. If you don’t have local emergency management contact information, it can be found online at gohsep.la.gov/about/parishpa.

  • Place debris curbside. Debris cannot be collected on private property.

  • Do not prop up debris against trees and utility poles or place in the vicinity of fire hydrants and utility boxes. That makes it more difficult for cleanup crews to collect.

  • Debris should be separated into the following six categories:       

    • Household garbage such as discarded food, packaging and papers.

    • Construction debris such as building materials, carpeting, furniture and mattresses.

    • Vegetation debris such as tree branches and leaves.

    • Household hazardous waste such as batteries, paints and cleaning supplies.

    • White goods such as refrigerators, washers/dryers, water heaters and air conditioners.

    • Electronics such as televisions, stereo equipment and computers.

  • Go online to this link to see a graphic that explains how to sort debris:

www.fema.gov/media-library/assets/images/110554

  • Other tips to speed up debris collection include:

    • Try to combine debris piles with your neighbors.

    • Secure refrigerator and freezer doors with duct tape.

    • Limit curbside household garbage to two 32-gallon containers or eight trash bags.

    • Get more and tips on flood clean up, repairing, and rebuilding at www.fema.gov/Louisiana-disaster-mitigation.

Wednesday, 24 August 2016 00:00

Zika and Business Interruption Insurance

As the Zika virus continues its rapid spread and amid travel warnings, including one advising pregnant women not to travel to popular tourist destination Miami Beach as well as advice to postpone non-essential travel to Florida’s Miami-Dade County, questions on business interruption insurance are bound to arise.

So this is perhaps a good time to review what a business interruption insurance policy covers.

The Insurance Information Institute (I.I.I.) reminds us that business interruption coverage, sometimes known as business income insurance, covers financial losses resulting from a business’s inability to operate because of property damage due to an insured event.

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http://www.iii.org/insuranceindustryblog/?p=4553