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Tags >> Business Continuity
Mar 13
2014

Using the Results of Your BIA to Develop Disaster Recovery Requirements

Posted by Courtney Bowers in DR , Disaster Recovery , Business Continuity , BIA , Avalution Blogs

Courtney Bowers

By Michael Bratton, Avalution Consulting
Originally posted on Avalution Consulting’s Business Continuity Blog

So you’ve just completed your business impact analysis (BIA) – identifying recovery time objectives for a variety of processes and functions throughout your organization and captured the names of applications and systems that business owners state they just can’t live without. In addition, the IT department heard you were conducting a BIA and mentioned on a few different occasions that they were excited to see what the final results would be to help with their planning. You’ve taken all the applications and their reported recovery time and recovery point objectives and crammed them into a very lengthy spreadsheet, and then the inevitable happens… you realize that everything you have collected is a huge mess.

Jan 08
2014

Using ISO 27031 to Guide IT Disaster Recovery Alignment with ISO 22301

Posted by Courtney Bowers in ISO 22301 , Disaster Recovery , Business Continuity , Avalution Blogs

Courtney Bowers

By Greg Marbais, Avalution Consulting
Originally posted on Avalution Consulting’s Blog

Many organizations struggle to define the best method to meet business expectations regarding information technology (IT) recovery. ISO 27031 provides guidance to business continuity and IT disaster recovery professionals on how to plan for IT continuity and recovery as part of a more comprehensive business continuity management system (BCMS). The standard helps IT personnel identify the requirements for Information and Communication Technology (ICT) and implement strategies to reduce the risk of disruption, as well as recognize, respond to and recover from a disruption to ICT.

Dec 24
2013

Rudolph the red-faced business continuity manager (a Christmas tale – sort of!)

Posted by Andy Osborne in Disaster Recovery , Business Continuity Plans , Business Continuity Management , Business Continuity

Andy Osborne

By Andy Osborne, Consultancy Director at Acumen

Once upon a time there was a senior manager called Rudolph who, on top of his other responsibilities, was put in charge of the business continuity project. Rudolph was a busy chap with a lot on his plate – he didn’t have time for detail. And anyway, disasters never happen do they? Well, only to other people. 

Dec 18
2013

Multi-Site Disaster Response and Coordination Best Practices

Posted by Courtney Bowers in Disaster Response , Disaster Recovery , Business Continuity , Avalution Blogs

Courtney Bowers

By Stacy Gardner, Avalution Consulting
Originally posted on Avalution Consulting’s Blog

Most organizations that have experienced a crisis would likely agree that advance planning is critical to enabling an effective response. When a disaster impacts several sites simultaneously, it makes coordination even more chaotic, so the importance of a defined structure increases. Organizations with multiple facilities or sites, especially those within “at-risk” regions, should take proactive steps to prepare their organization for events that require a widespread and coordinated response. Specifically, these preparedness steps include enabling coordination, communication, and adherence to organizational policies in advance of a disaster to ensure all sites implement appropriate response procedures. This article summarizes best practices that help enable sites to work together and execute common, approved response strategies to minimize impact and reduce confusion.

Nov 13
2013

Delving into the depths

Posted by Andy Osborne in Business Continuity Plans , Business Continuity Planning , Business Continuity Management , Business Continuity

Andy Osborne

By Andy Osborne, Acumen.    
Originally posted on Oz's Business Continuity Blog

Following the recent departure of number one son to Manchester (see “University challenge”), on Sunday afternoon I decided to address a small issue that's been troubling me for a while. For several years, in fact. When I say troubling, I mean causing my blood to simmer gently on a pretty much permanent basis, and to boil over about once a week, often punctuated by the phrase "...and tidy your @*~%#& bedroom!"

Nov 11
2013

Business Continuity Scoping: Why Products and Services?

Posted by Courtney Bowers in Business Continuity , Avalution Blogs

Courtney Bowers

By Jacque Rupert, Avalution Consulting
Originally posted on Avalution Consulting’s Blog

A Business Continuity Scoping Approach That Contributes to Better Management Engagement and Prioritization of Risk Management Efforts

Nov 01
2013

University Challenge

Posted by Andy Osborne in Planning , Crisis Management , Business Continuity Management , Business Continuity

Andy Osborne

By Andy Osborne, Consultancy Director at Acumen

We recently reached a significant milestone in the Oz family history, when we transported number one son (number one as in the sequence in which they arrived, as opposed to any order of preference, I hasten to add) with a car chock-full of his gear, to his chosen university in Manchester, some 120 miles from home.

Oct 29
2013

BCM/DR/ERM Terms: The Difference Between a Disaster Mgmt and a Crisis Mgmt (An Outsiders View)

Posted by Alex Fullick in Disaster Recovery , Business Continuity Management , Business Continuity

Alex Fullick
Recently, I was asked to sit in on a meeting – not participate mind you – and listen to some discussions that were going on regarding a project.  The discussions revolved around requirements and were pretty intense and detailed at time.   The point is, there was a question asked about Disaster Planning and Business Continuity Plans (BCP) and if they had to include anything in their scope.  My ears perked up on this one…and yet, I had to keep quite.The question asked by one of the attendees was this, “What’s the difference between a disaster and a crisis?”  Of course, I wanted to answer this but a quick look and grin from the individual that asked me to attend, told me not to interrupt because she knew I was chomping at the bit to jump into the fray.What I found interesting was the explanation given by one of the meeting participants, who I found later, had no involvement in Disaster Recovery (DR), Business Continuity Management (BCM) or Emergency Response Management (ERM) for that matter.  They weren’t even up to speed on technology; he was a business analyst (BA).  But his description was something I thought I’d pass along to others because it really got the message across to people in the room; something many of us have stumbled over in the past when trying to explain our industry terminology to ‘outsiders.’   I’ve paraphrased all the comments by the meeting participants into two descriptions below.  Before I forget, I’m not stating one way or another whether he was right or wrong, just conveying some information that might help others when communicating the differences or terms related to DR, BCM and ERM.A Disaster Is…“An event that causes major problems for a company or community…”“A disaster is something that happens suddenly and you have to immediately respond to it…”“With a disaster you have impacts that are immediately apparent…”“…something major that stops us from working.”“…something that has gone beyond normal crisis management processes.”“Everyone is impacted and involved…”A Crisis (Management) Is…“…is the management of the disaster or emergency situation…”“…a group of knowledgeable leaders (Note: “leader’ wasn’t defined) that make decisions to ensure activities      start/complete when required…” “…a team that coordinates response  activities…”“…the Single Point of Contact for questions and guidance as to what to do…”“Following documented plans and procedures to help respond to the situation…”“…managing the situation before it becomes a full-scale disaster.”“…not everyone needs to be involved with the management of a crisis.”I thought it was rather interesting coming from someone not in the industry, especially knowing how much people get these terms (and others) confused.  At least not one asked what the difference is between a contingency plan and a recovery plan.The descriptions are rather simplified and effective.  People understood after a minute or two what was being discussed and it helped get the meeting moving.  With industry terminology, it can get very confusing because there are so many different variations on what both of these mean; even among industry experts, professionals and practitioners.   Corporations that offer DR/BCM/ERM services also end up using their own terminology as well, so that adds to the confusion.I thought this person didn’t too badly of a job of stating the difference.  Of course, I wanted to state a few things but since he got his message across to a large group that had difficulty understanding between the terms.By the way, when they were completed, they decided they didn’t need to include DR, BCM or ERM in their project (Hope that doesn’t become a jinx on their project…) **NOW AVAILABLE** “Heads in the Sand: What Stops Corporations From Seeing Business Continuity as a Social Responsibility”and“Made Again Volume 1 – Practical Advice for Business Continuity Programs” by StoneRoad founder, A.Alex Fullick, MBCI, CBCP, CBRA, ITILv3Available at www.stone-road.com, www.amazon.com & www.volumesdirect.com
Oct 14
2013

Planning for Every Scenario is “for the Birds”

Posted by Courtney Bowers in Business Continuity , Avalution Blogs

Courtney Bowers

By Stacy Gardner, Avalution Consulting
Originally posted on Avalution Consulting’s Blog

Why “Chicken Little” and “Black Swan” Planning is NOT the Way to Respond to Recent Catastrophic Events

Aug 01
2013

More than a Plan: Establishing a Disaster Recovery Program

Posted by Courtney Bowers in Disaster Recovery , Business Continuity , Avalution Blogs

Courtney Bowers

By Glen Bricker, Avalution Consulting
Originally posted on Avalution Consulting’s Blog

Many organizations think having a disaster recovery plan is all the protection they need from disasters. However, there is so much more to disaster recovery than just a plan! That’s why most industry professionals see disaster recovery as an ongoing program or process that contains a number of distinct elements. Key process activities include:

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