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Tags >> Business Continuity
Nov 15
2012

Applying Root Cause Analysis (RCA) to Business Continuity

Posted by Courtney Bowers in Business Continuity , Avalution Blogs

Courtney Bowers

By Stacy Gardner, Avalution Consulting
Article originally posted on Avalution Consulting’s Blog

Though many business continuity standards emphasize the importance of tracking corrective actions to address identified issues, the recently published ISO 22301 (and previously BS 25999-2) also requires conducting a root cause analysis – looking not just at an issue, but its cause and how it can be prevented in the future.   Root cause analysis (RCA) is an approach that seeks to proactively prevent reoccurrences of the same adverse event or systems failure by tracing causal relationships of a failure to its most likely impactful origin, then putting measures in place to mitigate underlying causes to ultimately help prevent recurrence of the adverse event in the future.  While common in disciplines that deal with extreme precision and protection of life (e.g. quality and environmental health and safety), there’s no reason the business continuity discipline cannot benefit from a similar approach, particularly for practitioners looking to fully implement ISO 22301.  This article explains root cause analysis and identifies how organizations can benefit from implementing the concept in a business continuity context.

Oct 26
2012

Using Toolkits to Make Business Continuity Easier

Posted by Courtney Bowers in Business Continuity , Avalution Blogs

Courtney Bowers

By Greg Marbais, Avalution Consulting
Article originally posted on Avalution Consulting’s Blog

Many business continuity professionals face shrinking budgets and, because of an expanding business continuity program scope and aggressive recovery objectives, lack the time necessary to “touch” all areas of the organization and optimally prepare for disruptive events. As a result, practitioners need a way to create repeatable processes to execute recurring planning activities in a decentralized manner while making efficient use of the organization’s personnel to comply with management’s expectations. One approach we often find useful in rolling out a standardized, thorough, efficient and repeatable process for business continuity activities is the creation of a business continuity program toolkit. A business continuity toolkit typically contains a set of instructional narratives, as well as templates, tools and examples to help dispersed personnel appropriately execute business continuity planning activities consistent with organizational standards.

Sep 12
2012

How to Determine Risk Appetite in the Context of Business Continuity

Posted by Courtney Bowers in Business Continuity , Avalution Blogs

Courtney Bowers

By Brian Zawada & Jacque Rupert, Avalution Consulting
Article originally posted on Avalution Consulting’s Blog

The introduction of ISO 22301 (Societal security – Requirements – Business continuity management system) more closely aligns business continuity to the broader risk management discipline. A major contributor to this alignment is the standard’s requirement to understand the organization’s “risk appetite” (a term not used in BS 25999). 

May 24
2012

What Makes a Great Recovery Plan?

Posted by Courtney Bowers in Business Continuity , Avalution Blogs

Courtney Bowers

By Glen Bricker, Managing Consultant, Avalution Consulting
Article originally posted on Avalution Consulting’s Blog

The goal of any recovery plan, regardless of the size or nature of the organization, is to protect life, minimize damage from an event, and quickly resume the delivery of critical products and services to meet customer requirements.  How this is accomplished, however, not only depends on the nature of the organization, but also its customers, size and resources, and culture.  The objective is to build plans that are based on realistic requirements, fit within the organization’s culture, and remain cost effective and appropriate.  The remainder of this article will discuss these characteristics and how they are incorporated into recovery plans.

Apr 05
2012

The Business Continuity Exercise: Where the Rubber Meets the Road

Posted by Courtney Bowers in Business Continuity , Avalution Blogs

Courtney Bowers

By Christopher Burton, Senior Consultant, Avalution Consulting
Article originally posted on Avalution Consulting’s Blog

Since 2005, Avalution Consulting has performed hundreds of business continuity exercises with organizations in every major industry and sector throughout the United States.  No matter the scope of the exercise or the level of complexity, several key elements enable the successful outcome of this important component of the business continuity lifecycle.  This perspective shares some of our lessons learned, highlights the importance of exercising and provides insight into our time-tested exercise methodology. 

Mar 26
2012

Business Continuity Tools for Small Businesses – We Can Do Better!

Posted by Courtney Bowers in Business Continuity , Avalution Blogs

Courtney Bowers

By Susan Giffin, Managing Consultant, Avalution Consulting
Article originally posted on Avalution Consulting’s Blog

We recently published a perspective (Business Continuity for Small Businesses – We Can Do Better!) on how most small and medium-sized organizations escape the complexity of larger organizations and thus have the opportunity to implement streamlined business continuity planning processes, which should include:

Mar 15
2012

Business Continuity for Small Businesses – We Can Do Better!

Posted by Courtney Bowers in Business Continuity , Avalution Blogs

Courtney Bowers

By Robert Giffin, Director, Avalution Consulting
Article originally posted on Avalution Consulting’s Blog

If you have less than 500 employees, odds are you don’t have someone working full-time on business continuity. And, unless regulations require you to perform planning in some manner, your organization may not have a business continuity plan at all!