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Volume 27, Issue 3

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March 19, 2014

HELICOPTER CRASH BESIDE SPACE NEEDLE AN HOUR AGO

By Vali Hawkins Mitchell

 

I live in Seattle. I listen to KOMO news daily. The helicopter traffic guys keep us moving every day. Their copter crashed this morning. 2 dead. More injured. And as I watch the news on KOMO TV…the news employees are reporting on the event with their emotions tucked back as deep as possible to do their jobs. This was their company, their co-workers, they saw the crash out their window. My heart goes out to them. And I am again humbled by the topic of my book about people in their companies having big emotions, disasters, and hoping they have a plan in place. Wishing I could run down there to help. Hoping they have a protocol in place for the immediate situation, knowing counselors will be volunteering, HR and EAP providers will be called in, and the day will progress to the next news story. The staff will be expected to just move forward. The costs will be numerated into small boxes in accounting books. There will be funerals. There will be memorials. I wonder if the person driving the car to work who was missed by the ball of flame by only a few feet will have a good day at work or go home and get drunk. I wonder. I care. Emotional preparations for unexpected incidents cannot be ignored. I am weary of trying to “sell a damn book” in order to get people to consider the long term ramifications of emotional impact on companies. But I know the costs, because I have done the math and provided companies the format to do so. I know the costs and emotionally charged long term influence of the IMPACT of this helicopter next to the Seattle Space needle will involve KOMO employees, locals, tourists who can’t go on the monorail today, first responders, and much more.

With planes disappearing, nations unhinged, and helicopters falling out of the sky, I admit I wish this morning that I didn’t know that each event was not only an emotional strain, but a fiscal devastation to all parties. Once again, I encourage you and your company to plan for the expected and the unexpected. Sigh.

"The Cost of Emotions in the Workplace"  www.improvizion.com