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September 9, 2013

Preparing for Notorious Cyber Attack Dates: Radware Provides Five Steps to Secure Your Network

MAHWAH, N.J. – There are several dates throughout the year that are notorious for wreaking havoc on businesses via denial-of-service (DoS) attacks, data breaches and even malware or botnet assaults. As September 11th nears, rumors about coordinated cyber attacks on American websites continue to increase. Because of these potential risks, it's imperative that businesses tighten their network security measures now in order to protect themselves from potential intrusion or disruption, which can result in profit-loss and tarnished user confidence.

According to Radware(R), (RDWR) a leading provider of application delivery and application security solutions for virtual and cloud data centers, there are two types of dates that hackers target: ideological and business-relevant dates. Ideological dates refer to holidays and anniversaries that have a cultural, religious or secular tie to the adversary. High-risks times for the United States in addition to September 11th include Memorial Day, Election Day and Independence Day. Business-relevant dates involve a period of time that companies are particularly vulnerable to attacks, such as Black Friday, Cyber Monday, or even regular business hours.

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http://finance.yahoo.com/news/preparing-notorious-cyber-attack-dates-093000480.html

In the not-so-distant past, company information, files and data were confined to the four walls of the organisation. After 5 pm, and on weekends and holidays, this information was largely inaccessible to the average employee. Now, the availability of company data is seen in an entirely different light, with employees accessing files from three or four different devices any day of the week.

To address this data protection nightmare brought on by the bring-your-own-device (BYOD) movement, many forward-thinking companies have already implemented mobile device management (MDM) and mobile file management (MFM) tools and procedures. But, as devices continue to become ingrained in the workplace, making it increasingly mobile-centric, it's important to ask: what's next?

- See more at: http://www.computerworld.com.sg/tech/mobile-and-wireless/blog-beyond-mdm-and-mfm-whats-next-for-byod/#sthash.d8AZz2Do.dpuf

In the not-so-distant past, company information, files and data were confined to the four walls of the organisation. After 5 pm, and on weekends and holidays, this information was largely inaccessible to the average employee. Now, the availability of company data is seen in an entirely different light, with employees accessing files from three or four different devices any day of the week.

To address this data protection nightmare brought on by the bring-your-own-device (BYOD) movement, many forward-thinking companies have already implemented mobile device management (MDM) and mobile file management (MFM) tools and procedures. But, as devices continue to become ingrained in the workplace, making it increasingly mobile-centric, it's important to ask: what's next?

- See more at: http://www.computerworld.com.sg/tech/mobile-and-wireless/blog-beyond-mdm-and-mfm-whats-next-for-byod/#sthash.d8AZz2Do.dpuf