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Summer Journal

Volume 29, Issue 3

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Industry Hot News

Industry Hot News (6268)

In our quest for business productivity and cost savings, compliance teams are all too often being given increasing demands to keep the organization out of trouble, but are not being allocated additional budget to achieve this goal.

It typically takes a high-profile violation or industry-wide regulations like FCPA, to kick-start the implementation of risk management and compliance programs. And even then, there’s resistance due to concerns about the cost for these new programs and the potential for additional bureaucracy, slower decision-making and operational inefficiencies. When given the choice, today’s business executive tends to err on the side of speed over process.

Today’s automated ERP systems are designed with the intention of streamlining information delivery and decision-making, as well as providing decision-makers with sufficient information to make informed decisions and then providing electronic decision-making and audit tracking. The best of both worlds: speed and process accuracy, plus compliance.

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http://corporatecomplianceinsights.com/artificial-intelligence-new-superpower-business-compliance/

Wednesday, 31 August 2016 00:00

Is Compliance Positioned for Effectiveness?

At Protiviti, my colleagues and I often receive questions regarding the proper positioning of compliance, often starting with this one: Who does compliance report to? While certainly this is an important question, it’s not the first one to ask.

Positioning the chief compliance officer (CCO) and the independent compliance function for effectiveness is a matter of first understanding the roles and responsibilities executive management and the board want them to play. This understanding provides a strong context for evaluating how to position compliance within the organization, an important point of view because of disparity in practice in positioning compliance and defining the responsibilities expected of it. The lack of a one-size-fits-all solution prompts a question: What is it that the CCO and the independent compliance function are expected to do?

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http://corporatecomplianceinsights.com/compliance-positioned-effectiveness/

The weeks, hours and days following a home or business fire can present a difficult scenario. It is not easy to see the big picture when surveying the damage to precious possessions that are charred and covered with soot. While the most important thing is human safety, it can be disheartening to begin the task of cleaning up once the smoke clears and the hot spots cool down.

How to Begin

The most important part of the restoration process is organization. After surveying the destruction, a three ring binder should be utilized to take notes on all correspondence and conversations with the insurance company and the professional team hired to perform the restoration. Since the aftermath of the fire is highly stressful, it is easy to miscommunicate or forget vital details. The pockets of the binder can provide storage of all documentation and receipts, which can be photocopied if proof is required.

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http://nationaldisasterrecovery.org/after-the-fire-smart-steps-toward-fire-damage-restoration/

Wednesday, 31 August 2016 00:00

Along with Hurricanes Come Hackers

With hurricane season in full swing, supermarkets and electronic stores aren’t the only businesses in danger of looting. When defenses are down and attention is elsewhere during a natural disaster, critical data and intellectual property is just as vulnerable to looting as the shopping center down the street.

Each year, the amount of personal information targeted from data breaches only continues to grow. There was a new record set near the end 2015 when 191 million U.S. voters’ identities were exposed, surpassing the previous record for the largest single data beach. Personally identifiable information, including voters name, date of birth, gender, and addresses were exposed for more than a week before the database was officially shut down. Just imagine the opportunity for hackers during natural disasters when systems are down for a similar time frame.

Take “Superstorm Sandy,” back in 2012. Cyber criminals used confusion in the aftermath of the hurricane as part of a social engineering scheme to steal information. One organization received a call requesting an emergency download of sensitive personnel information needed to assist staff that had been affected by flooding. Lost internet connectivity as a result of the storm meant the help desk could not make a reasonable verification of who was making the request and sent the highly sensitive information to the bogus caller’s “backup site,” which was, as it eventually transpired, a system controlled by hackers. During times of crisis we are more susceptible to cyber criminals willing to prey on our good nature and eagerness to help.

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http://www.riskmanagementmonitor.com/along-with-hurricanes-come-hackers/

The enterprise is becoming obsessed with scale, and for good reason. With Big Data already well inside the horizon, organizations need to ramp up their data handling and storage capabilities in short order or find themselves on the losing end of the service-based economy.

The cloud, of course, has ample scale, but few organizations are willing to place all of their eggs in the basket of third-party resources, which means private and hybrid infrastructure will need to scale to new heights by the time the decade draws to a close.

The vendor community, always willing to step up in a crisis, has been pushing out a steady stream of scale-out cloud solutions, running the gamut from all-cloud to open source or integrated hardware/software solutions.

...

http://www.itbusinessedge.com/blogs/infrastructure/theres-more-than-one-way-to-scale-your-storage.html

ATLANTA, Ga. – September is National Preparedness Month and as tropical storm activity increases this week, FEMA encourages residents in the Southeast to make disaster preparedness a priority.

“National Preparedness Month focuses on the need to be ready for disasters and emergencies,” said FEMA Region IV Regional Administrator Gracia Szczech. “September is also the peak of hurricane season, so preparing now is even more critical for families and businesses in the Southeast.”

Across the nation, disasters are occurring with greater frequency, and are larger and more complex. Severe weather and other emergencies can strike with little or no warning and can have disastrous impacts. Already this year, states across the Southeast have experienced destructive severe storms and flooding. Seven named tropical cyclones have formed this summer, and they serve as a reminder to be ready for hurricanes.

“Make preparedness a part of your everyday life,” said Szczech. “Prepare for the hazards that are most likely to occur where you live and work. Talk to your family and make a family disaster plan. But don’t stop there. Practice your plan. Practicing in advance of a disaster makes you better prepared to handle any emergency you may encounter.”

Download and use the free FEMA app, which provides valuable safety tips to help you prepare for and recover from more than 20 natural and man-made hazards. The FEMA app lets you receive weather alerts from the National Weather Service for up to five locations across the nation, making it easy to follow severe weather that may be threatening your family and friends.

The app also provides family communication plans, a customizable checklist of emergency supplies, and maps of open shelters and disaster recovery centers. The app is available on the Apple App Store and Google Play.

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FEMA's mission is to support our citizens and first responders to ensure that as a nation we work together to build, sustain, and improve our capability to prepare for, protect against, respond to, recover from, and mitigate all hazards.

CHARLESTON, W. Va. — It has been just over two months since President Obama issued a major disaster declaration authorizing federal assistance for survivors of severe storms and flooding that hit southeastern West Virginia on June 22-29, 2016. The declaration, signed by the president on June 25, provides for assistance to individuals in these 12 counties: Clay, Fayette, Greenbrier, Jackson, Kanawha, Lincoln, Monroe, Nicholas, Pocahontas, Roane, Summers, and Webster.

The deadline to register for assistance from the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) is Wednesday, Sept. 7, but already the agency has approved nearly $40 million in grants to survivors to help them through their recovery. Disaster assistance for individuals may include grants to help homeowners and renters with temporary housing, essential home repairs, personal property replacement, and disaster-related needs.

However, not all survivors qualify for FEMA assistance; others qualify for some aid, but for less than they need. Where can these survivors turn for help? Whom can they call? Where can they go?

It may surprise you to know that FEMA is not the only government agency that can assist you in a disaster. Many other state and federal agencies offer services that may be of help to you.

The good news is that finding and getting help from a federal or state government agency is easier than you might think.

You can get online access to scores of free programs, grants and services available to West Virginia survivors and their families. (No login or personal information required.) Working both independently and in cooperation with FEMA, nearly two dozen cabinet departments and agencies – in state and federal government – offer assistance.

Visit www.disasterassistance.gov/find-assistance , where you will be asked to answer nine simple questions about your living situation and the kind of help you need. One more click and you will be taken to a personalized list of agencies and programs specific to your needs.

Among the government entities that may be of help to you, if FEMA cannot meet all your needs, are these:

U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA)

One of FEMA’s federal partners in disaster recovery, the SBA, offers low-interest disaster loans to homeowners and renters, as well as businesses of all sizes. SBA disaster loans may cover repairs, rebuilding and the cost of replacing lost or disaster-damaged real estate and personal property.

You must first register with FEMA (before the Sept. 7 deadline) to receive an SBA disaster loan application. If you do not qualify for an SBA loan, as a homeowner or renter, you still may be eligible for assistance from FEMA. You may register with FEMA by phone (voice, 711 or relay service) at 800-621-3362 (TTY users call 800-462-7585) or online at DisasterAssistance.gov .

If your SBA loan application is approved, you may be eligible to borrow additional funds to cover the cost of improvements that will protect your property against future damage. Examples include elevating utilities, water heaters and furnaces, and installing retaining walls and sump pumps.  Applicants may be eligible for an SBA loan increase, for mitigation purposes, of up to 20 percent of their physical damages.

For more information about SBA loans, call SBA’s Disaster Assistance Customer Service Center at 800-659-2955, email disastercustomerservice@sba.gov, or visit http://www.sba.gov/disaster.  TTY users may call 800-877-8339. Applicants may also apply online using the Electronic Loan Application (ELA) via SBA’s secure website at https://disasterloan.sba.gov/ela. The deadline to file a physical disaster loan application with the SBA is Wednesday, Sept. 7.

U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA)

Low-income survivors living in rural areas of West Virginia may be eligible for one of these USDA programs:  rural housing loans, rural housing repair loans and grants, or rural rental housing.

Rural housing loans offer a subsidy to help reduce your mortgage payments for a short time to get you through your recovery. Your family income determines the amount of the subsidy. You may use the loan to help buy, build, repair, improve, or relocate your primary home. You may also use funds to buy and prepare sites, including water and sewer.

Rural Housing Repair Loans and Grants may be used to repair, improve, or modernize your home, or remove health and safety hazards. The program’s loans are available only to individuals over 62 years of age.

Rural rental housing and cooperative housing assistance is available in nearly every county in West Virginia. You can get listings of participating housing projects in the state by visiting http://offices.sc.egov.usda.gov/locator/WV .

To qualify for any of these programs, you must live in a rural area and be considered low-income or very low income. For more information about these and other USDA programs, visit www.rd.usda.gov/wv .

U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD)

Section 203(h) Mortgage Insurance for Disaster Victims helps survivors get a mortgage to buy a new home or rebuild their damaged one. Section 203(k) Rehabilitation Mortgage Insurance gives homebuyers and owners two options:

  • Buy or refinance a house and its rehabilitation costs with a single mortgage, or

  • Finance the rehabilitation of their existing home.

Money may be used for rehabilitation work ranging from minor repairs to total reconstruction.

To qualify for Section 203(h) Mortgage Insurance for Disaster Victims, you must:

  • Own a one-family home damaged or destroyed during the June 22-29 storms, and
  • Live in one of the counties qualified in the presidential declaration of June 25.

Section 203(k)-insured loans can finance:

  • Residential section rehabilitation of a property that also has non-residential uses.

  • Conversion of any size property to a one- to four-unit structure.

To qualify for Section 203(k) Rehabilitation Mortgage Insurance, you must:

  • Be able to make monthly mortgage payments, and

  • Be rehabilitating a home at least one year old.

To learn more, visit http://portal.hud.gov/hudportal/HUD?src= . To apply, view http://www.hud.gov/ll/code/getllst.cfm? to find an approved lender near you.

   

U.S. Department of the Treasury

Do not let a disaster come between you and your money.

If you get federal benefit payments by paper check, you can switch to direct deposit so your money is directly deposited into a checking or savings account on payment day each month. Direct deposit removes the risk of a delayed payment due to a disaster event. You may choose from two electronic payment options:

  • Direct Deposit - Your monthly payments are deposited into your checking or savings account. Learn more about direct deposit online at www.godirect.gov.

  • Direct Express® Debit MasterCard® - A prepaid debit card you can use to make retail purchases, pay bills, and get cash back. Your government payments are loaded onto you card each month. It is a no- or low-cost alternative to paper checks. For more information on Direct Express, visit https://fiscal.treasury.gov/GoDirect .

Disaster deductions, faster refunds and additional time to file your tax return are among special tax law provisions that may be available to you to help you recover financially from the June 22-29 storms and flooding. Depending on the circumstances, the IRS may grant additional time to file returns and pay taxes.

Both individuals and businesses in the 12 designated counties can get a faster refund by claiming losses related to the disaster on the tax return for the previous year, usually by filing an amended return. To find out if you qualify for this program and to learn how to use it, visit https://www.irs.gov/forms-pubs and type “i4684” in the search box.

Redeem savings bonds early – before the end of the 12-month holding period. If you live in one of the 12 designated counties in West Virginia, you may be able to do this. You may also be able to get faster replacement of any paper bonds lost or destroyed in a disaster. For more about this program, visit www.treasurydirect.gov/indiv/redeem_disaster.htm .

Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration’s (SAMHSA)

The SAMHSA Disaster Distress Helpline is a national hotline that offers year-round disaster crisis counseling. If you feel distressed because of the June storms and flooding, you can use this

free service. It is toll-free, multilingual, crisis support, and is available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

Helpline staff provides counseling and support, and can help you learn how to cope with common stress reactions. They can also provide information and referrals to local resources for follow-up care.

If you or someone you know is struggling to cope with the disaster, you are not alone; you can call the helpline at 800-985-5990 or text “TalkWithUs” to 66746.

To learn more, visit the SAMHSA website.

WorkForce West Virginia

Did the storms and flooding put you out of work? Are you looking for a job? Are you eligible for unemployment compensation? You may want to visit http://workforcewv.org .

WorkForce West Virginia is a state agency that oversees the state unemployment compensation
program and is a one-stop center for work force resources, including job opportunities and training. All its services are free and available at 13 comprehensive career centers throughout the state. (Click here for locations and hours.) In addition, WorkForce West Virginia has the state’s largest online database of job openings.

RISE West Virginia

Virginia Gov. Earl Ray Tomblin created RISE West Virginia in response to economic needs in the small business community resulting from the June storms and floods. RISE West Virginia is a state-operated, public-private mini-grant program providing assistance to small businesses that were operational before the flooding and are working to reopen while struggling with existing debt and limited capital. For more information about RISE West Virginia, visit http://wvflood.com .

More resources available to West Virginians who need help:

  • West Virginians seeking information about disaster-related services and unmet needs, as well as volunteering and donating, should visit the state’s Help for West Virginia Disaster website http://wvflood.com. West Virginians who wish to help with flood response and recovery may sign up with West Virginia Voluntary Organizations Active in Disasters (VOAD) at www.volunteerwv.org or wvvoad.org.

  • Contact West Virginia 211 ( for help finding food, childcare, crisis counseling, and many other resources available in your community. If you or someone you know is struggling with post-disaster stress, you are not alone. Help is as near as your phone. Call the Help for West Virginia Helpline at 844-435-7498. Also, you can contact the Disaster Distress Helpline at 800-985-5990 or text “TalkWithUs” to 66746.

  • Survivors with questions regarding FEMA registration or who have not yet registered for assistance should call the FEMA Helpline (voice, 711 or relay service) at 800-621-3362. (TTY users should call 800-462-7585) or visit DisasterAssistance.gov . The toll-free lines are open 7 a.m. to 10 p.m. EDT seven days a week. Multilingual operators are available.

  • West Virginia homeowners and renters who have registered for disaster assistance with FEMA are encouraged by recovery officials to “stay in touch.” If survivors change their address or phone numbers they should update that information with FEMA. Missing or erroneous information could result in delays getting a home inspection or in receiving assistance.

Additional information on West Virginia’s disaster recovery can be found by visiting fema.gov/disaster/4273, twitter.com/femaregion3, twitter.com/FEMA, facebook.com/FEMA, fema.gov/blog and the flood information pages at http://wvflood.com/Pages/default.aspx .

ATLANTA, Ga. – What’s the most important app you have on your phone—the one you can’t live without? Facebook? YouTube? Snapchat? Google Maps? All of them? What makes any of these apps so important to us is they provide content, connection, and capability. Some apps are fun, some are useful, and some help us get things done.

What if there were an app to make you more aware of severe weather, help you prepare for an emergency and ultimately make you, your friends and family more disaster ready? Would you download it? According to a recent survey by Pew Research, 40 percent of Americans have used their smartphone to look up government services or information.

The FEMA app is free to download on the App Store and Google Play. It’s packed with features that make it useful and informative too, and allows you to:

  • Get weather alerts;
  • Get safety tips;
  • Prepare an emergency kit checklist; and
  • Get safety reminders.

Every minute counts when severe weather threatens. Nearly half a million Americans already have the FEMA app. So take a few minutes today, and download the FEMA App for free on the App Store and Google Play.

On any given day, you may just find it to be the most important app on your phone.

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FEMA's mission is to support our citizens and first responders to ensure that as a nation we work together to build, sustain, and improve our capability to prepare for, protect against, respond to, recover from, and mitigate all hazards.

Anyone looking for a view of the historic flooding in Baton Rouge, La., probably has seen the map created by Warren Kron and his team. Kron is GIS Manager in the IT department of the City of Baton Rouge and the Parish of East Baton Rouge. He's charged with working with geographic information systems (GIS) within the greater framework of IT. The goal? To help government services such as law enforcement and emergency personnel function effectively and to provide more comprehensive visual information services to residents.

For example, Kron's GIS work as part of the government of Baton Rouge includes creating applications to help people identify their council district based on the street address of their house.

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http://www.informationweek.com/software/productivity-collaboration-apps/baton-rouge-flood-map-using-it-know-how-in-emergency-situations/d/d-id/1326749

Wednesday, 31 August 2016 00:00

Risk Assessment For Business Continuity

In creating business continuity plans, every organization completes a series of risk assessment exercises. Without this general risk assessment, it would be impossible to prioritize what BCM plans are needed. Each time a specific threat arises, business continuity teams need a risk assessment process to determine if the event merits activation of BCM teams and plans.

Monitoring Early Warning Signs

The key to effective event-specific risk assessment is to have some early warning detection in place. To best manage unplanned incidents, it helps to have visibility into the potential disruptions before they occur. Obviously, certain types of disruptive events are more easily monitored than others. Weather, for example, can be monitored closely via the National Weather Service, Accuweather and other sources. Most major storms are predicted in advance, enabling close monitoring by BCM teams. Similarly, floods and fire warnings are often weather-related and threat levels can be monitored closely.

Company reputation is another threat that is easily monitored via social media, traditional media and call center feedback. Many organizations keep their finger on the pulse of these channels to determine when and how to respond to situations as they arise.

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http://www.missionmode.com/risk-assessment-for-business-continuity/

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