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Monday, 19 February 2018 20:26

GS-2 Editorial

Written by  Daniel Graff-Radford & Ann Pickren

Daniel Graff-Radford

What are the top 3 threats to organizations today?

The threat landscape is becoming more global. We are seeing a tremendous growth in global messaging instead of local messaging by each local office. In that regard, we see the following:

  • Increase in weather events disrupting business continuity – rise in globalized business paired with increases in dangerous weather events.
  • Cyber-attacks – given our dis-connectedness, these issues can become global very quickly. We see the partnerships between IT and business continuity forming to respond effectively.
  • Business Continuity Response Brevity – We are seeing the historically relevant response plans are too bulky and cumbersome to keep updated and are inhibiting response time. When we look at organizations’ response success, many times the difference can be because they have transitioned to shorter more targeted plans per issue that allow flexibility.

 

What areas of BC/DR do you think organizations should be investing in to secure their resiliency for the next 3-5 years? (Where should they put their money?)

The macro environment is changing with increasing weather and man-made events that is helping to bring to light the need for BC/DR funding as a whole. It is our collective responsibility to make sure that this money is used as effectively and efficiently as possible. I think the following are things every organization should work on:

  • Look at their response plans. Are they short, targeted and flexible to deal with more targeted issues
  • If the organization is moving to a global plan, do they consider for the local needs of each region? Privacy, local data, language, etc?
  • What is the partnership between IT and BC? When there are cyber-attacks, who does what?

 

Would you consider the influx of Millennials with the exiting of baby boomers to be a challenge to the technology changes in the resiliency industry? (i.e.: loss of knowledge Vs incoming training needs)

Working in Enterprise software for over 16 years has exposed me to many companies. Some do a great job of succession planning and others do not. The great news about our industry is the mission-driven nature of the people working in companies to ensure continuity. When people make a decision to join our ranks, they do so with a sense they are going to make a difference in their fellow workers’ safety and the longevity of the company. I have found that mindset seems to transcend people’s competitive natures and creates a desire to share knowledge and experience.

 v

Ann Pickren

What are the top 3 threats to organizations today?
  • Becoming irrelevant to the organization - Unrecognized need for change and adaptation of our processes. All too often I see BC programs that fail to recognize and adapt to changing environments within and outside their organizations. They want things to remain constant so the tried and true ways of the past will continue to work for the future. Change is a constant and requires constant adjustments.
  • Cyber security events are escalating faster than any other threat for every organization.
  • Difficulty or challenge in engaging the corporation in the need for a comprehensive program to identify and manage risks within a global business continuity program.

 

What areas of BC/DR do you think organizations should be investing in to secure their resiliency for the next 3-5 years? (Where should they put their money?)
  • Re-engineering their BC/DR program for the changing environments, highly automated processes, lower tolerance for disruptions,
  • Cyber security programs – prevention and response – bring BC and the security teams to the table together.
  • Developing strong risk programs
  • Re-evaluating overall Crisis Communications programs for faster, more effective communications across the entire organization, including external supply chain dependencies

 

Would you consider the influx of Millennials with the exiting of baby boomers to be a challenge to the technology changes in the resiliency industry? (i.e.: loss of knowledge Vs incoming training needs)

On the contrary, I view the influx of Millennials as a breath of fresh air. Millennials challenge the status quo. They bring new ideas to the table with their new views on old practices. This is a needed evolution and the Millennials will be the instigators of change.

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