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Summer Journal

Volume 30, Issue 2

Full Contents Now Available!

Jon Seals

Jon Seals

CHICAGO – Summer is finally here, and while that means fun in the sun, it can also bring the threat of dangerous storms. In recognition of Lightning Safety Awareness Week, the Federal Emergency Management Agency’s Region 5 office wants you to learn how to reduce your lightning risk while outdoors.

“If you hear thunder, lightning is close enough to pose an immediate threat,” said FEMA Region V Acting Administrator Janet M. Odeshoo. “Seek shelter as quickly as possible. There is no place outside that is safe when a thunderstorm is in the area.”

Substantial buildings such as offices, schools, and homes would offer good protection. Once inside, stay away from windows and doors and anything that conducts electricity such as corded phones, wiring, plumbing, and anything connected to these. If you are caught outside with no safe shelter anywhere nearby, the following actions may reduce your risk:

  • Never shelter under an isolated tree, tower or utility pole. Lightning tends to strike the taller objects in an area.
  • Immediately get off elevated areas such as hills, mountain ridges or peaks.
  • Immediately get out and away from ponds, lakes and other bodies of water.
  • Stay away from objects that conduct electricity, including wires and fences.
  • Never lie flat on the ground.

The best way to protect yourself against lightning injury or death is to monitor the weather and postpone or cancel outdoor activities when thunderstorms are in the forecast. Lightning can strike from 10 miles away, so if you can hear thunder, you are in danger of being struck by lightning.

For additional information on lightning safety—wherever you may be this summer—visit www.ready.gov/thunderstorms-lightning. You can find more valuable storm safety tips by visiting www.lightningsafety.noaa.gov.  Consider also downloading the free FEMA app, available for your Android, Apple or Blackberry device, so you have the information at your fingertips to prepare for severe weather.

FEMA's mission is to support our citizens and first responders to ensure that as a nation we work together to build, sustain, and improve our capability to prepare for, protect against, respond to, recover from, and mitigate all hazards. Follow FEMA online at twitter.com/femaregion5, www.facebook.com/fema, and www.youtube.com/fema.  The social media links provided are for reference only. FEMA does not endorse any non-government websites, companies or applications.

The Business Continuity Institute

We are used to assessing what the immediate threats are to our organizations as those threats are happening right now. Organizations across the world are suffering from adverse weather, cyber attacks, supply chain failures and technical failures. They may not affect our own organizations straight away, but with the increasing dependence on other organizations in this matter, they probably will do in the near future.

But what about the long-term future? Organizational strategies are often looking beyond the short-term with five-year plans or even ten-year plans in place. So when we consider business continuity and resilience, should we be looking further ahead as well? Should we be assessing what the megatrends are that our organizations need to be preparing for now?

Megatrends are seen as the large social, economic, political, environmental or technological changes that occur over the long-term, changes that have the potential to profoundly shape the way we work and live our lives. Climate change, and everything it entails, is one such megatrend that could, or perhaps already is, having a major impact on our organizations.

The Business Continuity Institute is delighted to be collaborating with Siemens on a new study that will look at how organizations build resilience across the board, and what they think about climate change as one of these megatrends. You can help inform this study by taking a few minutes to complete the survey, and be in with a chance of winning a €100 Bol.com gift card.

This study is primarily looking at responses from the Benelux region, but input would be welcome from elsewhere in order to help make comparisons.

Having workloads distributed across multiple clouds and on-premises is the reality for most enterprise IT today. According to research by Enterprise Strategy Group, 75 percent of current public cloud infrastructure customers use multiple cloud service providers. A multi-cloud approach has a range of benefits, but it also presents significant challenges when it comes to security.

Security in a multi-cloud world looks a lot different than the days of securing virtual machines, HashiCorp co-founder and co-CTO Armon Dadgar said in an interview with ITPro.

“Our view of security is it needs a new approach from what we’re used to,” he said. “Traditionally, if we go back to the VM world, the approach was sort of what we call a castle and moat. You have your four walls of your data center, there’s a single ingress or egress point, and that’s where we’re going to stack all of our security middleware.”

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http://www.datacenterknowledge.com/archives/2017/06/16/what-it-pros-need-to-know-about-multi-cloud-security/

Musings of a Cognitive Risk Manager

To drive change, you need buy-in, and to achieve buy-in, your people need to know the “why” behind the change. This is the premise behind cognitive risk governance, the “designer” of human-centered risk management. James Bone, author of Cognitive Hack: The New Battleground in Cybersecurity…the Human Mind, further explains the cogrisk framework.

In my last article, I explained the difference between traditional risk management and human-centered risk management and began building the case for why we must re-imagine risk management for the 21st century.  I purposely did not get into the details right away, because it is really important to understand why a thing must change before change can really happen.  In fact, change is almost impossible without understanding why.

Why put on sunscreen if you don’t know that skin cancer is caused by too much exposure to ultraviolet rays from the sun?  We know that drinking and driving is one of the deadly causes of highway fatalities, but we still do it!  Knowing the risk of a thing doesn’t prevent us from taking the chance anyway.  This is why diets are so hard to maintain and habits are so hard to change.  We humans do irrational things for reasons we don’t fully understand.  That is precisely why we need cognitive risk governance.

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http://www.corporatecomplianceinsights.com/emergence-cognitive-risk-era-role-cognitive-risk-governance/

Every so often it’s good to shake things up. Sometimes the simple act of asking questions about what we do in business continuity and why we do it can give us a fresh point of view and point out areas for improvement.

The venerable business impact analysis (BIA) is a case in point. Do you produce a BIA because it helps you optimise business continuity and its cost-effectiveness?

Or do you have one because the auditors ask for it and it’s part of the process? Adaptive BC challenges business continuity managers on this and several other important points.

It’s a fact that we lose focus at some point while we are working. The loss of focus can range a few seconds to several years.

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http://www.opscentre.com/adaptive-business-continuity-new-abc-keeping-things-running/