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Industry Hot News

Industry Hot News (394)

Open-plan offices have become the norm for many companies wishing to optimize their space, encourage collaboration between staff and breaking down traditional hierarchies.

However, recent research challenges the idea that open-plan working is a surefire route to productivity. Far from an antidote to the inefficiency of closed-off offices, open-plan working can mean staff are beleaguered with distractions and stifled by lack of personal space.

Gensler’s 2016 Workplace Survey found that 67 per cent of the UK workforce feel drained at the end of each working day due to their office environment. In addition, badly designed offices are suppressing innovation in businesses: although over eight million UK employees work in open-plan environments, many of these do not offer variety or choice, nor are they tailored to specific tasks and practices.

“Enclosed office space is not the enemy,” says Philip Tidd at Gensler. “Moving to a simplistic open-plan may not be the most effective option in today’s hyper-connected workplace.”

...

https://www.regus.com/work-us/reconsidering-open-plan-new-thinking-productive-space/

(TNS) - During the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks, first responders in New York City had trouble talking to each other on radios, leading to more chaos that deadly day. Afterward, federal authorities told local agencies to digitize their radio systems to enable such communications, but it's taken the better part of two decades for Dallas to catch up to the costly recommendations.

But if officials in the city and county have their way, Dallas police and firefighters and county sheriff's deputies will soon be able to use their radios to instantly talk to other first responders nearby.

County commissioners this week approved a $68 million contract with the city and Motorola that will upgrade the outdated radios and provide maintenance for 15 years. Because the city of Dallas needs far more radios than the county does, officials said, Dallas is paying 75 percent of the costs, while the county's share is 25 percent. The City Council will vote on the deal next week.

...

http://www.govtech.com/em/safety/If-Terrorists-Hit-Dallas-Would-First-responder-Radios-be-Ready.html

It's no secret that unstructured data is growing at astronomical rates, contributing to the big data deluge that's sweeping across enterprise data storage environments. A new study from Western Digital and 451 Research sheds some new light on the scale of the challenge that storage administrators face each day and how it's fueling the object storage boom.

A 451 Research survey of 200 technology decision makers and influencers, sponsored by Western Digital, reveals that a majority of enterprises (63 percent) and service providers are managing storage capacities of 50 petabytes (PB) or more. More than half of that of that data falls under the unstructured category, existing outside of databases and within files, multimedia content and other formats.

Service providers are particularly being inundated with unstructured data. They reported annual growth rates of 60 to 80 percent, compared to 40 to 50 percent for enterprise users.

...

http://www.enterprisestorageforum.com/storage-management/unstructured-data-growth-fueling-massive-migration-to-object-storage.html

Okay, everyone, raise your hand if you looked at the headline of this article and thought, “Wait a second, why is Herrera writing about my business continuity budget when everybody just finished doing them? Could his timing possibly be worse”?

Actually, my timing could hardly be better, and I’ll tell you why.

The worst way to devise your BCM program budget is to do it in a rush just before it’s due. The best way—the way that is mostly painless and delivers the most accurate, realistic, and defensible result—is to work on it bit by bit over the course of the year. I’ll explain what I mean in a minute. For now, just take it on faith that the time to start thinking about your next BCM budget is now.

...

https://bcmmetrics.com/business-continuity-budget/

The explosive growth in data, the digitization of information, and the massive acceleration in public cloud adoption are some of the key drivers behind the growing demand for public cloud-based solutions among enterprises searching for greater flexibility and cost savings, and shifting IT to the OpEx model.

Among the cloud-based solutions that enterprises are pursuing, disaster recovery is emerging as a top IT priority. A recent survey points to disaster recovery, along with workload mobility and archival automation, as a key driver of enterprise cloud adoption, with 82 percent of those surveyed citing disaster recovery as a critical reason to move to the cloud. Meanwhile, another report estimates the disaster recovery as a service (DRaaS) market will grow from $2.19 billion in 2017 to $12.54 billion in 2022, with the managed services provider segment achieving the highest growth.

The majority of DRaaS solutions in the market today have very good recovery mechanisms focused on replicating on-premise systems to the public cloud. This traditional model of failover has served companies well for capturing migration to the cloud during times of outages.

...

http://www.datacenterknowledge.com/industry-perspectives/disaster-recovery-service-not-cloud-migration

(TNS) - Facing an active shooter situation may be as likely as getting struck by lightning, but that doesn't mean lightning never strikes.

That was the warning given to University of Idaho faculty, staff and students as part of an active shooter response training session Wednesday afternoon in the Vandal Ballroom of the Bruce Pitman Center.

In a short training video from the Department of Homeland Security shown that afternoon, experts emphasized the need for everyone to develop a survival mindset before being confronted with danger. In the face of a shooter, the video outlined, respondents must decide whether to run, hide or fight to stay safe.

...

http://www.govtech.com/em/safety/Run-Hide-and-Fight.html

Friday, 08 December 2017 15:12

EM: Run, Hide and Fight

A new finish for your old car may look great, but in the end, it may still be a ’71 Pinto.  The cost of the BIA process – writing, distributing, validating, analyzing, reporting, presenting to Management, revising and repeating annually – can be a staggering amount.  Yet a BIA may be no more valuable than that new paint job.

Business Continuity programs rely on BIA’s because ‘standards’ says they must.  BIA data gathering isn’t useless– just time-consuming, and questionably valuable.

  • There’s little proof that BIA’s improve planning, since there’s often little in a BIA to inform individual plan tasks.
  • If it doesn’t improve planning, it won’t improve organizational readiness either.
  • Most enterprise criticalities are already understood within the organization; there’s little point looking for them (again) in a BIA.
  • The man-hours spent on BIA development, completion and analysis is shockingly disproportionate to the value the results provide.

...

https://www.ebrp.net/a-paint-job-wont-make-your-car-safer/

The worst wildfire season in the history of modern California is taking another bad turn, as three major fires have destroyed more than 200 homes and buildings.

Strong winds will be fanning the flames. The state’s foresters have issued a purple wind alert for Southern California, something they have never done before.

This follows a Department of Insurance report that insurers have incurred more than $9 billion in claims so far from the October fires, being $8.4 billion in residential claims, $790 million in commercial property, $96 million in personal and commercial auto, and $110 million from other commercial lines. County-level details here.

...

http://www.iii.org/insuranceindustryblog/?p=5650

One of the biggest trends in business today can be summed up by an acronym that is (almost) completely familiar to anyone who has ever taken their own bottle of wine to a restaurant or house party. It’s BYOD, and it involves employees bringing not their own bottle but their own mobile devices to work and beyond, and using them to perform work functions or access company data.

A 2016 study by Tech Pro Research found that 59% of the organizations surveyed let employees use their personal devices for work purposes.

A study by Syntonic in the same year found an even higher acceptance of BYOD. It determined that 87% of companies depend on letting employees use mobile business apps from their personal smartphones.

Gartner sums up the trend as follows: “Bring Your Own Device: BYOD is here and you can’t stop it.”

...

https://www.mha-it.com/2017/12/byod-security/

(TNS) - The Saline County, Kan., Commission Tuesday approved the purchase of hardware to enhance the 911 system.

Computer Technology Director Brad Bowers said the software from Tyler Technologies will cost $31,435, with the city of Salina paying half of that cost.

Commissioners then heard from Emergency Management Director Hannah Stambaugh that the 911 radio equipment might have to be upgraded.

Stambaugh said other counties that have upgraded from analog UHS to 800 HMz radio communication systems have spent up to $11 million.

"It has the potential of having a pretty hefty price," she said, but it could be good for public safety.

...

http://www.govtech.com/em/disaster/New-Radio-System-Could-be-Costly.html

Wednesday, 06 December 2017 19:23

New County Radio System Could be Costly

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