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Tuesday, 19 September 2017 07:57

FEMA: Hurricane Debris Pick-Up a Priority for Florida Recovery

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. – As Floridians begin the cleanup process after Hurricane Irma, the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) urges everyone to know the best way to remove debris from their property.

Don’t wait to clean up storm damage. Document damage with photos or videos.

Take care when cleaning up. Dangling power lines, flooding and other hazards remain. If trees and other debris have fallen on your private property, be sure to check with your insurance agent to determine if tree damage is covered by your policy. As you clean up, be sure to keep in mind the following information:

  • Due to the magnitude of recent disaster events, residents can move debris from their private property to public rights-of-way for pick up and removal by local governments for a limited time. Debris removal from private property is generally the responsibility of the property owner, just as before the hurricane.
  • Follow guidance from your local officials when placing debris for collection. Separate debris into six categories when disposing along the curb:
    • Electronics, such as televisions, computers or phones;
    • Large appliances, such as refrigerators, washers, dryers, stoves or dishwashers.  Be sure to seal or secure the doors so that they are not accessible;
    • Hazardous waste, such as oil, batteries, pesticides, paint or cleaning supplies. If you suspect that materials contain lead-based paint, keep them moist or contain materials in plastic bags so that the paint does not become airborne;
    • Vegetative debris, such as tree branches, leaves or plants;
    • Construction debris, such as drywall, lumber, carpet or furniture; and
    • Household garbage, discarded food, paper or packaging.
  • Place debris away from trees, poles or structures including fire hydrants and meters.
  • Remove all water-damaged materials from your home and place curbside for pickup.
  • Debris should not block the roadway.

Hurricane Irma left behind fallen trees, limbs and trash from damaged buildings on private and public property. Workers have begun picking up the tons of debris dumped on streets, highways, curbsides and from private yards. Federal and state aid will help pay for removing debris from public property.

For more Hurricane Irma recovery information, visit www.fema.gov/hurricane-irma.

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FEMA’s mission is to support our citizens and first responders to ensure that as a nation we work together to build, sustain, and improve our capability to prepare for, protect against, respond to, recover from, and mitigate all hazards.

Disaster recovery assistance is available without regard to race, color, religion, nationality, sex, age, disability, English proficiency or economic status. If you or someone you know has been discriminated against, call FEMA toll-free at 800-621-FEMA (3362). For TTY call 800-462-7585.

FEMA’s temporary housing assistance and grants for public transportation expenses, medical and dental expenses, and funeral and burial expenses do not require individuals to apply for an SBA loan. However, applicants who receive SBA loan applications must submit them to SBA loan officers to be eligible for assistance that covers personal property, vehicle repair or replacement, and moving and storage expenses.